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Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: endocarditis | opioids | infection | heart health

Opioids Increase Heart Infections

Chauncey Crandall, M.D. By Wednesday, 19 January 2022 04:48 PM Current | Bio | Archive

A study conducted at West Virginia’s largest medical center found that admissions for endocarditis related to drug abuse more than doubled between 2008 and 2015.

That parallels an increase in drug use in the state. Endocarditis is a life-threatening infection of the heart’s inner lining and valves.

One way you get it is through using dirty needles to shoot heroin or other injection drugs. In 2015, the researchers found that 66 people were admitted to the hospital for endocarditis related to drug abuse. That was up from 26 cases in 2008. Most often, the drug abuse was “mixed.”

That’s how the hospital codes opioids — which include prescription painkillers like Vicodin (hydrocodone) and OxyContin (oxycodone), as well as illegal drugs like heroin and illicitly made fentanyl.

Endocarditis is treated with intravenous antibiotics for two to six weeks, according to the National Institutes of Health. In some cases, surgery is also needed to repair damaged heart valves, or to help clear the infection.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 64,000 Americans died of a drug overdose in 2016 — with opioids involved in two-thirds of those deaths.

© 2022 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Crandall
A study conducted at West Virginia’s largest medical center found that admissions for endocarditis related to drug abuse more than doubled between 2008 and 2015.
endocarditis, opioids, infection, heart health
189
2022-48-19
Wednesday, 19 January 2022 04:48 PM
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