Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: diabetes | high blood pressure | alzheimers

Diabetes, Hypertension Increase Alzheimer's Risk

By Tuesday, 24 November 2020 04:35 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Although the mechanism of the connection is not well understood, we do know that people with diabetes face a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that results in too much sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream. In cardiovascular disease, this high sugar level and abnormal metabolism damages blood vessels, paving the way for atherosclerosis.

In the brain, the same condition is believed to produce chemicals known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are believed to aid the development and/or worsening of Alzheimer’s disease.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is the biggest cause of both stroke and vascular dementia, and is also linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition, research has found that older people with high blood pressure are more likely to have biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease in their spinal fluid.

Studies have also found an increased dementia risk in people whose blood pressure readings varied.

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Although the mechanism of the connection is not well understood, we do know that people with diabetes face a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
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2020-35-24
Tuesday, 24 November 2020 04:35 PM
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