×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - In Google Play
VIEW
×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - On the App Store
VIEW
Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: deep vein thrombosis | blood clot

DVT: Athletes at Risk

Chauncey Crandall, M.D. By Tuesday, 24 July 2018 04:28 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

The death of TV journalist David Bloom following an airplane flight brought the danger of travel-related deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to national attention.

But there is another group that is at high risk for DVT: athletes.

Eighty-five percent of those who suffer a DVT while flying are athletes, according to AirHealth.org.

Athletes who have suffered a DVT during travel include tennis great Serena Williams; Tim Hentzel, a competitive triathlete; hockey player Adam McQuaid, and professional golfer Joey Sinclair.

According to Alison White, a long distance runner who suffered a DVT and now is dedicated to raising DVT awareness, reasons for the increased risk include:

• Dehydration. Prolonged periods of exercise can lead to dehydration, which thickens the blood. When your blood is thicker, it is more likely to clot. Caffeine and alcohol are diuretics that can also thicken your blood.

• Low heart rate. With a lower heart rate, blood is moving through your body more slowly, and is more likely to clot.

• Soreness and injury. When your body experiences trauma, it may begin to form a clot at the site. If you break a bone or strain a muscle, you may be required to wear a brace or a cast that limits mobility, increasing the chance of clotting.

• Travel. High-level athletes travel often for games and races. If you travel long distances and are immobile in a car or plane, your blood can pool and form a clot.

© 2022 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Crandall
The death of TV journalist David Bloom following an airplane flight brought the danger of travel-related deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to national attention.
deep vein thrombosis, blood clot
241
2018-28-24
Tuesday, 24 July 2018 04:28 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved