Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: death | heart attack | indigestion | diabetes

'Silent' Heart Attacks Raise Risk

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Tuesday, 28 August 2018 04:44 PM Current | Bio | Archive

We usually think of a heart attack being preceded by obvious symptoms such as chest pain, but a new study finds that almost half of them are “silent,” and can go unnoticed.

Researchers at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., followed nearly 9,500 men and women for nine years.

During that time, 3.3 percent of participants suffered a silent heart attack while slightly 4.1 percent suffered one that was preceded by symptoms, according to a report in Circulation.

A study last year found that nearly 80 percent of heart attacks are not diagnosed — and therefore not treated — because they are silent heart attacks.

But even most silent heart attacks are not completely without symptoms. In fact, they are preceded by unconventional symptoms like indigestion or muscle pain.

People with diabetes need to be particularly aware of the possibility of a silent heart attack because the disease causes nerve damage that can mask obvious symptoms.

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A study last year found that nearly 80 percent of heart attacks are not diagnosed — and therefore not treated — because they are silent heart attacks.
death, heart attack, indigestion, diabetes
157
2018-44-28
Tuesday, 28 August 2018 04:44 PM
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