Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: c-reactive protein | vision | heart disease

High CRP Threatens Eyesight

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Friday, 26 January 2018 04:23 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Doctors have known for some time that an elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) indicates increased risk for heart disease. But new information suggests that this measure threatens your eyesight as well.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a condition that causes loss of vision in the eye’s center field (the macula), which is caused by damage to the retina.

Age-related macular degeneration is the main cause of visual impairment in people over the age of 60.

Although this condition generally does not cause total blindness, it is devastating to daily life because people who suffer from AMD cannot read, drive, watch television, play cards, or enjoy many other activities.

In one study, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health evaluated data from 2,147 people, and matched the CRP blood levels of 647 people with AMD with those without it.

They found that people with high CRP levels had a 50 percent higher risk of age-related macular degeneration.

The researchers also found that risk of neovascular macular degeneration — an early stage of the disease — was nearly doubled.

The results of the study were recently published in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.

About 1.75 million Americans suffer from vision loss from AMD; this number is expected to balloon to almost three million by 2020.

Following a heart healthy lifestyle, which includes losing weight, exercising, quitting smoking, reducing stress and getting enough sleep, are all ways to lower your CRP level.

That will help you conquer heart disease and also protect your sight as well.

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Dr-Crandall
Doctors have known for some time that an elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) indicates increased risk for heart disease. But new information suggests that this measure threatens your eyesight as well.
c-reactive protein, vision, heart disease
253
2018-23-26
Friday, 26 January 2018 04:23 PM
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