Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: aspirin | warfarin | heart failure

Aspirin Safe for Heart Failure Patients

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Wednesday, 27 November 2019 12:51 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Some research has raised concerns about the safety of aspirin for heart failure patients. But a new study appears to offer reassurance.

The study of more than 2,300 patients found that those on daily aspirin were not at heightened risk of being hospitalized for, or dying from, heart failure.

That has been a particular concern because, in theory, aspirin could interfere with the benefits of certain heart failure drugs.

For the new study, researchers analyzed data from a clinical trial in which heart failure patients were randomly assigned to take either aspirin or warfarin, which is used to prevent blood clots.

Patients in the aspirin group took 325 mg per day.

Over 10 years, more than 19 percent of aspirin patients were hospitalized for heart failure, or died of the disease. That compared with just less than 23 percent of warfarin users.

The team also accounted for other factors including patients’ age and heart disease severity. In the end, there was no statistical difference between the two groups in their risk of heart failure complications.

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The study of more than 2,300 patients found that those on daily aspirin were not at heightened risk of being hospitalized for, or dying from, heart failure.
aspirin, warfarin, heart failure
175
2019-51-27
Wednesday, 27 November 2019 12:51 PM
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