Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: aspirin | platelets | clotting | stroke

'Aspirin Resistance' Controversy

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Friday, 23 February 2018 04:18 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Taking low-dose aspirin regularly seems to be an easy way to prevent dangerous clots, but some people experience heart attacks and strokes even though they take daily aspirin therapy.

This is because they are believed to be “aspirin resistant.”

It’s believed that about 25 percent of the population is resistant to the blood-thinning effects of aspirin.

There are several explanations given for aspirin resistance, including the possibility that some people have too much plaque in their coronary arteries, or that their blood platelets may be turning over too quickly.

Another explanation is that people are not taking aspirin regularly, even though they say they do.

A study was performed a few years ago by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, in which 400 healthy volunteers were recruited to test the concept of aspirin resistance.

The researchers found evidence of resistance in nearly half of the participants who were given coated aspirin, but the problem disappeared when they repeated the test with an uncoated type.

Because there is no evidence that coated aspirin is more tolerable on the stomach than regular aspirin, people taking aspirin for its anti-clotting properties should choose the uncoated variety.

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Taking low-dose aspirin regularly seems to be an easy way to prevent dangerous clots, but some people experience heart attacks and strokes even though they take daily aspirin therapy.
aspirin, platelets, clotting, stroke
193
2018-18-23
Friday, 23 February 2018 04:18 PM
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