Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: alzheimers | aging | relocation

Find a Sense of Place in Your 60s

By Tuesday, 10 November 2020 04:30 PM Current | Bio | Archive

One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease is loss of memory, which results in confusion and an inability to function. We know that elderly people who are hospitalized often suffer confusion because of the disruption of their daily routine, and also because they’ve been uprooted from their familiar surroundings.

While research is lacking on how moving from one part of the country to another affects memory, I cannot imagine anything more disruptive, especially when people are older.

I live in a region that attracts retirees, and I am not surprised that they often seem confused by the move. They’ve come from the Northeast and Midwest, leaving the towns where they were born or raised, or other places they have lived in for decades, relocating to a completely new part of the country.

The streets are different, the stores are unfamiliar, and their routine is disrupted. Often, they leave their family and friends behind as well.

My advice? When you’re in your 60s, make sure that you are already living in the location where you intend to grow old.

That way you can develop the deep memory reserves that will keep you sharp for the rest of your life

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Dr-Crandall
While research is lacking on how moving from one part of the country to another affects memory, I cannot imagine anything more disruptive, especially when people are older.
alzheimers, aging, relocation
198
2020-30-10
Tuesday, 10 November 2020 04:30 PM
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