Dr. David Brownstein,  editor of Dr. David Brownstein’s Natural Way to Health newsletter, is a board-certified family physician and one of the nation’s foremost practitioners of holistic medicine. Dr. Brownstein has lectured internationally to physicians and others about his success with natural hormones and nutritional therapies in his practice. His books include Drugs That Don’t Work and Natural Therapies That Do!; Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It; Salt Your Way To Health; The Miracle of Natural Hormones; Overcoming Arthritis, Overcoming Thyroid Disorders; The Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet; and The Guide to Healthy Eating. He is the medical director of the Center for Holistic Medicine in West Bloomfield, Mich., where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their teenage daughters, Hailey and Jessica.

Tags: The Pill | risks associated with birth control pills | regulating periods | Dr. David Brownstein

Perils of The Pill

Monday, 04 Jun 2012 09:15 AM

Question: My 17-year-old daughter has been on birth control for one year. What is your opinion of the risks of having her on them at such a young age?

Dr. Brownstein's Answer:

Birth control pills contain synthetic forms of progesterone and estrogen in order to inhibit ovulation and implantation.

Unfortunately, birth control pills are associated with a host of issues, including problems with the thyroid gland, blood clots, heart attacks, elevated blood pressure, and increased risk of cancer of the cervix and liver.

Some studies have even shown an increased risk of breast cancer in women who took birth control pills.

Regulating menses can often be accomplished by cleaning up the diet and avoiding allergenic foods. Food allergy testing can be done through blood tests or via an acupressure technique called NAET (Namburipad’s Allergy Elimination Techniques).

Finally, heavy menstrual bleeding can usually be controlled by ensuring adequate thyroid function and/or supplementing with vitamin A. High doses of vitamin A (10,000 to 100,000 IU per day) can slow down heavy bleeding in the majority of women.

One note of caution: Vitamin A should be prescribed by a knowledgeable healthcare provider, as high doses can cause adverse effects. Women who are pregnant should not take high doses of vitamin A.

© HealthDay

   
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Birth control pills are associated with a host of issues, including problems with the thyroid gland, blood clots, heart attacks, elevated blood pressure, and increased risk of cancer of the cervix and liver.
The Pill,risks associated with birth control pills,regulating periods,Dr. David Brownstein
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2012-15-04
Monday, 04 Jun 2012 09:15 AM
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