Dr. David Brownstein, M.D
Dr. David Brownstein,  editor of Dr. David Brownstein’s Natural Way to Health newsletter, is a board-certified family physician and one of the nation’s foremost practitioners of holistic medicine. Dr. Brownstein has lectured internationally to physicians and others about his success with natural hormones and nutritional therapies in his practice. His books include Drugs That Don’t Work and Natural Therapies That Do!; Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It; Salt Your Way To Health; The Miracle of Natural Hormones; Overcoming Arthritis, Overcoming Thyroid Disorders; The Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet; and The Guide to Healthy Eating. He is the medical director of the Center for Holistic Medicine in West Bloomfield, Mich., where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their teenage daughters, Hailey and Jessica.

Tags: salt | hypertension | high blood pressure | cardiovascular disease
OPINION

Hypertension Doesn't Come From Salt

David Brownstein, M.D. By Wednesday, 29 October 2014 04:49 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

Like so many other doctors, I was taught in medical school that salt was a harmful substance. Of course, there was no mention of the difference between refined and unrefined salt. In fact, my professors probably didn’t know the difference.
 
Specifically, medical schools have been teaching that the use of salt leads to hypertension (high blood pressure). We were also told that if patients have hypertension, they must avoid salt. As I have learned from my own research, much of what I was taught in med school about salt proved to be false.
 
The assertion that salt leads to hypertension and worsening of cardiovascular disease is another in a long line of falsehoods still promoted by conventional medicine.
 
How did this myth get started? The initial finding that limiting salt in the diet lowered blood pressure was reported in 1904. Over the next 60 years, various studies found that huge amounts of salt given to animals caused elevated blood pressure.
 
Keep in mind, however, that in most of these studies the doses of refined salt given to the animals were dramatically higher than the recommended dose. That would be like giving a person at least 500 grams of sodium per day! (The average American gets approximately 3.4 grams of sodium per day.)
 
Of course in those huge amounts salt intake can have a negative effect. But I don’t see how anyone can extrapolate such results to a normal human diet.
 
And yet, that is exactly what happened. More and more doctors started sounding the “salt alarm,” claiming that we need to limit our salt intake to combat hypertension.
 

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Dr-Brownstein
Like so many other doctors, I was taught in medical school that salt was a harmful substance. Of course, there was no mention of the difference between refined and unrefined salt. In fact, my professors probably didn’t know the difference.
salt, hypertension, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease
268
2014-49-29
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 04:49 PM
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