Dr. David Brownstein,  editor of Dr. David Brownstein’s Natural Way to Health newsletter, is a board-certified family physician and one of the nation’s foremost practitioners of holistic medicine. Dr. Brownstein has lectured internationally to physicians and others about his success with natural hormones and nutritional therapies in his practice. His books include Drugs That Don’t Work and Natural Therapies That Do!; Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It; Salt Your Way To Health; The Miracle of Natural Hormones; Overcoming Arthritis, Overcoming Thyroid Disorders; The Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet; and The Guide to Healthy Eating. He is the medical director of the Center for Holistic Medicine in West Bloomfield, Mich., where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their teenage daughters, Hailey and Jessica.

Tags: nuts | cardiovascular disease | phytates | omega-3

Nuts Decrease Heart Risk

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Tuesday, 06 March 2018 04:28 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Three separate studies published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition examined the effect of nut consumption in relation to cardiovascular disease risk.

All three studies found a higher consumption of nuts was associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in those that consumed nuts.

One study found an inverse association with eating nuts and diabetes, while two others found no change with nut consumption and diabetes.

Study one found that the consumption of nuts was associated with a 24 percent lower risk of fatal heart disease.

Study two found a 29 percent lower risk.

Study three found that for each serving of nuts there was a 28 percent lower risk for cardiovascular disease.

Nuts contain essential fatty acids such as omega-6 and omega-3. The are also a good source of protein and fat. I encourage my patients to eat nuts as part of a healthy whole food diet.

They’re a great snack between meals.

Dehydrating nuts can inactivate compounds (e.g., phytates) that block the absorption of minerals, and exposing nuts to very high temperatures (more than 170 degrees Fahrenheit) can disrupt the essential fatty acids in them.

Slow roasting or dehydrating nuts at low temperatures can provide a healthy snack that will not disrupt the fatty acids and make them easier to digest.

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Three separate studies published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition examined the effect of nut consumption in relation to cardiovascular disease risk.
nuts, cardiovascular disease, phytates, omega-3
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2018-28-06
Tuesday, 06 March 2018 04:28 PM
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