Dr. David Brownstein,  editor of Dr. David Brownstein’s Natural Way to Health newsletter, is a board-certified family physician and one of the nation’s foremost practitioners of holistic medicine. Dr. Brownstein has lectured internationally to physicians and others about his success with natural hormones and nutritional therapies in his practice. His books include Drugs That Don’t Work and Natural Therapies That Do!; Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It; Salt Your Way To Health; The Miracle of Natural Hormones; Overcoming Arthritis, Overcoming Thyroid Disorders; The Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet; and The Guide to Healthy Eating. He is the medical director of the Center for Holistic Medicine in West Bloomfield, Mich., where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their teenage daughters, Hailey and Jessica.

Tags: kidneys | PPIs | vitamin B12 | heart attack

Adverse Effects of Proton Pump Inhibitors

By
Tuesday, 29 October 2019 04:46 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The slick commercials that promote proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) do not spend nearly enough time explaining their adverse effects.

As we learn and understand more about these medications, more problems are being revealed. Here’s a partial list of adverse effects from taking PPIs:

1. Increased risk of heart attack. Studies have found a 58 percent higher risk of heart attacks in PPI users. This should come as no surprise, because it is well-known that PPIs cause deficiencies of vitamins and minerals that are crucial for optimal heart function.

2. Increased risk of fractures. PPIs block acid production, which leads to poor digestion of nutrients, including minerals. This can result in poor bone mineralization and an increased fracture risk. Multiple studies have found a significantly higher risk of bone fractures with PPI use.1, 2, 3 And it doesn’t take long-term use. Increased fracture risk with PPIs was found immediately after the drug began to be used.

3. Kidney failure. One study found a 20 percent to 50 percent increased risk for developing chronic kidney disease in people who take a PPI. This same study found twice-daily dosing of a PPI was associated with a 46 percent higher risk of kidney failure. In addition, many people are placed on a PPI even after they have been told to take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), a type of medication that can also cause kidney problems. If you are taking an NSAID such as Motrin or Advil along with a PPI, you are at a much higher risk for developing kidney disease.

4. Vitamin B12 deficiency. Stomach acid is necessary for the body to break down vitamin B12 from food. Without adequate stomach acid, vitamin B12 will not be absorbed. Deficiency is common in people who take a PPI for longer than two months. Vitamin B12 deficiency can result in irreversible neuropathy, heart disease, and brain dysfunction. I discuss vitamin B12 deficiency in more detail in my book, Vitamin B12 for Health.

© 2020 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Dr-Brownstein
The slick commercials that promote proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) do not spend nearly enough time explaining their adverse effects.
kidneys, PPIs, vitamin B12, heart attack
328
2019-46-29
Tuesday, 29 October 2019 04:46 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved