Dr. David Brownstein,  editor of Dr. David Brownstein’s Natural Way to Health newsletter, is a board-certified family physician and one of the nation’s foremost practitioners of holistic medicine. Dr. Brownstein has lectured internationally to physicians and others about his success with natural hormones and nutritional therapies in his practice. His books include Drugs That Don’t Work and Natural Therapies That Do!; Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It; Salt Your Way To Health; The Miracle of Natural Hormones; Overcoming Arthritis, Overcoming Thyroid Disorders; The Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet; and The Guide to Healthy Eating. He is the medical director of the Center for Holistic Medicine in West Bloomfield, Mich., where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their teenage daughters, Hailey and Jessica.

Tags: cardiovascular | cancer | diabetes | fats

Nut Consumption Cuts Mortality Risk

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Tuesday, 01 October 2019 04:21 PM Current | Bio | Archive

For a study published in the journal BMC Medicine, researchers looked at the relationship between nut consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. The scientists reviewed data gathered up until July 2016, and found 29 studies that met their criteria.

The authors found that an increase in nut intake of 29 grams per day (approximately one ounce) was associated with a 29 percent decrease in heart disease, 15 percent decrease in cancer, 22 percent decrease in all-cause mortality, and 52 percent decrease in mortality from respiratory diseases.

Furthermore, there was a 39 percent decline in diabetes, 75 percent reduction in infectious diseases, and 63 percent reduction in kidney disease.

The scientists found similar results for tree nuts and peanuts. They summarized that “Higher nut intake is associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all-cause mortality, and mortality from respiratory disease, diabetes, and infections.”

Not too long ago, nuts were vilified by conventional doctors for containing fat. For more than 50 years, the powers that be repeatedly told Americans to lower the fat content in their diets. Americans complied.

And what happened? We have more heart disease, cancer, and chronic illness than we know what to do with.

Of course, simply studying biochemistry would have led anyone to conclude that we must have adequate fat in our diet.

And now that the research has clearly shown that was the wrong tactic, the same powers that be are walking back their low-fat recommendations.

Nuts are a good source of fat. This study showed many positive benefits of increasing nut consumption, including decreased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality risk.

I frequently recommend patients eat nuts as a source of good fats. More information about dietary fats can be found in my book, The Skinny on Fats.

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For a study published in the journal BMC Medicine, researchers looked at the relationship between nut consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality.
cardiovascular, cancer, diabetes, fats
302
2019-21-01
Tuesday, 01 October 2019 04:21 PM
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