Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Find out what others are saying about Dr. Blaylock by clicking here.
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Choose Period-of-Life Exams

Thursday, 30 Aug 2012 08:59 AM

Did you know that many doctors who endorse annual physicals refuse to have one? I am not one who endorses annual physicals. I think they are a bad idea; one that encourages unnecessary testing and ultimately leads to unnecessary treatments. I call such examinations hunting expeditions.
Instead, I think you should have period-of-life exams; one early in life and one as middle age approaches.
Here is the big dilemma of annual physicals: If you, as a physician, find something wrong on a blood test or some other test, what should you do? Should you ignore it or should you pursue it further?
This is not always an easy question to answer. Most doctors know this. That is why so few doctors have regular physicals or testing done on themselves. They are afraid that if they find something they will need more tests, some of which can be quite invasive. An invasive test is one that requires surgery (biopsy, endoscopic exams, etc.) or procedures that require the insertion of catheters or tubes (such as an arteriogram or bronchiogram).
While most of us do not mind giving a little blood, a urine specimen or having an X-ray or scan of some sort, we do not want our bodies invaded by instruments. This is especially so when the doctor (usually their nurse or assistant) informs us of the long list of complications possible. Most informed consent information is enough to send anyone’s blood pressure soaring.
For example, complications possible with colonoscopy include bowel perforation (tearing a hole in your colon), massive hemorrhaging, shock, pulmonary embolism, paralysis and even death. Pretty scary stuff! (Get advice for staying healthy while hospitalized by reading my special report "Survive Your Hospital Visit.")


The Period-of-Life Exams, which are done at the age of 21 and again at age 45, include the following tests:
• General physical exam
• Comprehensive Blood Studies
• Urinalysis
• Comprehensive Iron Studies
• Comprehensive Cardiovascular Tests
• Comprehensive Gastrointestinal Tests
• Detoxification Profile
• Essential and Metabolic Fatty Acid Profile
Special Tests for Men:
• PSA Test
• Testosterone levels
Special Tests for Women:
• Breast Exams
• Female Hormone Testing
• Bone Density Testing
I discuss these tests in detail, including why iron levels on the high side of normal can lead to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurological problems, in my special report "Health Exams that Can Save Your Life."
For more of Dr. Blaylock’s weekly tips, go here to view the archive.


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Thursday, 30 Aug 2012 08:59 AM
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