Doris Wild Helmering is a nationally known marriage and relationship counselor, weight loss expert, television and radio personality, and business management coach. She is author of nine books, 1,200 newspaper columns, six e-booklets, and has written for Reader’s Digest, Redbook, Self, and Scripps Howard News Service. She has been a guest on OPRAH, Good Morning America, and CNN. She received the Alumni Merit Award from St. Louis University for advancing the field of psychotherapy and the Woman of Achievement Award from Soroptimist International. She was awarded clinical status in the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the International Transactional Analysis Association.

You can visit her website at: www.doriswildhelmering.com .

Tags: retirement | marriage | counseling | control

Expect Adjustment When Spouse Retires

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Wednesday, 28 August 2019 04:31 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Her husband has been retired for a year, and she's ready to go back to work.

"Since he's retired he thinks he has first rights to the laptop. He thinks he should be able to check his email first. If I want to answer emails and catch up on the news, heaven forbid. If I'm using the laptop and he wants to use it, he looks at his watch impatiently. If that doesn't work, he pouts."

"Last week when I was out, he rearranged my dishes and spice rack. Then he tells me how much more efficient his arrangement is than the one I've been using for the past 37 years!

"If one of my friends stops by for a visit, he participates in our conversation. If I say, 'We're going out on the patio,' he says, 'I'll join you.'

When he invites himself I think, 'Go make your own friends.'

"Because he has more time since he's retired, he's always wanting me to invite our children over for dinner. Or he wants me to have friends for dinner and cards. I like our children and friends, but I'm the one who gets stuck with the preparation and most of the clean-up. And I get tired.

"When I go to the grocery store, he wants to go along. Yesterday I was picking out some strawberries, and he said, 'They look bad.' So I didn't buy them, but I thought they looked perfectly fine. When I was getting the broccoli he said, 'We haven't had cauliflower in a long time.' I knew what he was saying. 'Get cauliflower instead of broccoli.'

"If I go outside to garden, he tells me to come in and take a rest or come in and have lunch. He is not respectful of my routine.

"I was signing up for a course at the botanical garden. When he heard me on the telephone he said, "Sign me up, too." When I got off the telephone, I thought, 'I'm getting myself a job.'"

This couple is suffering through a period of adjustment. She's used to organizing and running the home, having the house to herself part of the time, and deciding her own schedule.

Her husband is probably lonely for companionship and hasn't figured out how to handle all the additional hours he has recently gained with retirement. Because of his need for interaction and time structure, he's coat-tailing on his wife's schedule. It also seems he's trying to run his wife's life.

I suggest that this couple decide who is going to run what show. Perhaps he will start being responsible for the cooking on Tuesday and Thursday nights. If he hasn't cooked in the past, he can sign up for a cooking course. This will give him contact with more people and a new interest and will help fill his time.

I also think a revision of who does what chores around the house is appropriate at this stage.

As to his desire to visit with his wife and her friends, the wife needs to hold steadfast to not always having him join them. This may mean that she will have to gently confront him when he says he'll accompany them. She might say, "Tom, we need to have some girl talk."

When a man or even a woman retires, it's a period of adjustment for many couples. The main thing is for both people to figure out how they would like to live their life on a daily basis and then make a plan. Without a conscious plan, many relationships suffer the retirement blues.

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World,” “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide,” and “Thin Becomes You” at Doris’ web page: www.doriswildhelmering.com.

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When a man or even a woman retires, it's a period of adjustment for many couples. The main thing is for both people to figure out how they would like to live their life on a daily basis and then make a plan.
retirement, marriage, counseling, control
628
2019-31-28
Wednesday, 28 August 2019 04:31 PM
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