Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

The app uses light-sensor technology to measure blood flow. It can also detect slight changes that might indicate an irregular heartbeat. [Full Story]
The app uses light-sensor technology to measure blood flow. It can also detect slight changes that might indicate an irregular heartbeat. [Full Story]
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition in which blood clots occur in a deep vein in your body (usually the legs). [Full Story]
The study from the UK found that people with more body fat show differences in brain structure, including lower volume of gray matter, which contains most of the brain’s nerve cells. [Full Story]
Your body clock, which is located in your brain’s hypothalamus, ensures biological processes run according to schedule. [Full Story]
Itchy skin is a common problem for many people with chronic kidney disease, even those not on dialysis. [Full Story]
A heart muscle disease called peripartum cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death in expectant mothers, accounting for 23 percent of deaths late in pregnancy. [Full Story]
Men who had two or more servings of yogurt a week had a 26 percent lower risk of developing precancerous growths in their colon, a study reports. [Full Story]
Aspirin has a long record of benefits and safety. With the prospect of it impacting both of the top killer diseases in the U.S., I am not backing away from my longstanding endorsement of taking it daily. [Full Story]
Insomnia affects up to 30 percent of the general population, and more than 200 genetic variants are associated with it. [Full Story]

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