Tags: Cancer | skin | cancer | sunburn | risk

Many Skin Cancer Patients Still Get Sunburned

Many Skin Cancer Patients Still Get Sunburned
(Copyright Fotolia)

Wednesday, 20 July 2016 03:17 PM

Many people who have had skin cancer still get sunburned, a new study shows.

Approximately 13 million Americans have a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer, either squamous or basel cell carcinoma. Although not as dangerous as melanoma, 2,000 people die each year from these forms of cancer, which can also be disfiguring. Sun exposure is the leading cause of nonmelanoma skin cancers, and treatment is estimated to cost $4.8 billion in the U.S. annually.

Investigators from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Md., analyzed self-reported survey results about sun protective practices from 758 people with previous skin cancer and from 34,161 people without a history of skin cancer.

The study focused on non-Hispanic whites, the population most affected by kin cancer. Of the people without history, 18,933 were female and 15,228 were male, and of those with history, 390 were female and 368 were male, the researchers say.

The researchers defined protective practices as using sunscreen when going outside on a sunny day for more than an hour, wearing long sleeves or a wide-brimmed hat, and staying in the shade when outside on a sunny day for more than one hour. They defined sun avoidance as not going out into the sun.

Overall, they concluded that 44.3 percent of people with nonmelanoma skin cancer history reported frequent use of shade, compared to 27 percent of people without a history of skin cancer, and 20.5 percent of those with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer wore long sleeves, compared to 7.7 percent of those with no history.

Additionally, 26.1 percent of those with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer said they wore a wide-brimmed hat when outside in the sun, compared to 10.5 percent of people without a history, and 53.7 percent of those with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer said they wore sunscreen, compared to 33.1 percent of those without a history.

Moreover, 44.7 percent of those with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer reported using more than one form of sun protection, while only 19.4 percent of those without a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer said they did so.

Most importantly, though, even though people with this skin cancer history tended to use one or all of these protective practices, many people with a history of skin cancer were still getting sunburned compared to those without a history -- 29.7 percent versus 40.7 percent, the study finds.

"These results suggest that physicians need to go the extra step in educating patients on the most optimal way of utilizing sun protection methods. Public health messages should also emphasize not only sun protection but how to do it correctly," says Dr. Anna Chien, a researcher on the team that did the study, which appears in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.



© 2021 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


   
1Like our page
2Share
Health-News
A new study finds that too many skin cancer patients are still getting sunburned.
skin, cancer, sunburn, risk
462
2016-17-20
Wednesday, 20 July 2016 03:17 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 
Newsmax TV Live

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved