Tags: Cancer | skin | cancer | non-melanoma | squamous | basal | cell

Skin Cancer on the Rise

Skin Cancer on the Rise
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By    |   Wednesday, 17 May 2017 11:53 PM

Two types of non-melamona skin cancer are increasing, according to researchers at Mayo Clinic. Diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma increased 263 percent, and basal cell carcinomas increased by 145 percent between 2000 and 2010.

Women aged 30 to 49 experienced the greatest increase in basal cell carcinoma diagnoses, while women aged 40 to 59 and 70 to 79 experienced the greatest increase in squamous cell carcinomas.

Men experienced a slight decline in squamous cell carcinomas, but men over the age of 29 showed increases in basal cell carcinomas.

Researchers blame tanning for part of the increase, noting that damage to the skin is cumulative.

"We know that the sun and some artificial sunlight sources give off skin-damaging ultraviolet, or UV, rays," says Christian Baum, M.D., a Mayo Clinic dermatologist and the study's senior author. "This skin damage accumulates over time and can often lead to skin cancer.

"Despite the fact that sunscreens and cautionary information have been widely available for more than 50 years, we saw the emergence of tanning beds in the 1980s, and tanning — indoors or out — was a common activity for many years.

"Eventually those blistering sunburns of your youth and hot, reddened skin, and peeling shoulders of your adulthood can add up to one or more skin cancers," he said.

The researchers also reported a shift in where the cancers are found, which they attributed to changes in exposure to UV light. Studies from older time periods found that basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas were diagnosed more often on the head and neck.

But, in the most recent time period, the records showed that basal cell tumors on the torso increased, as did squamous cell carcinomas on the arms and legs. A reason, Baum says, for using sunscreen on all exposed skin.

"Use sunscreen," says Baum. "This includes on your left arm for those who do a lot of driving. UV rays can penetrate car windows and exposed skin — even when the sun isn't shining. UV rays bounce around under the clouds, off the snow, buildings, and more, causing damage — even on gray days."

The paper was published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Taking nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, twice a day may lower your risk of non-melanoma skin cancer by 23 percent, according to an Australian study. "This is the first clear evidence that we can reduce skin cancers using a simple vitamin," said dermatologist and researcher Diona Damian.

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Two types of non-melamona skin cancer are increasing, according to researchers at Mayo Clinic. Diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma increased 263 percent, and basal cell carcinomas increased by 145 percent between 2000 and 2010.Women aged 30 to 49 experienced the greatest...
skin, cancer, non-melanoma, squamous, basal, cell, increase
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2017-53-17
Wednesday, 17 May 2017 11:53 PM
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