Tags: Cancer | prostate | breast | cancer | gene | links

Breast, Prostate Cancer Share Genetic Links: Study

By    |   Monday, 09 March 2015 03:45 PM

Women whose fathers, brothers, or sons develop prostate cancer may face greater risks for developing breast cancer, according to new research suggesting a common genetic link.
 
The study, published online in the American Cancer Society journal Cancer, indicates that doctors and clinicians should take a complete family history of all cancers — even those in family members of the opposite sex — to help assess a patient's risk of developing cancer.
 
Past studies have suggested the risk of developing breast and prostate cancer is greater among individuals with a family history of the same disease — particularly among first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, and children). But the latest work suggests a close relationship between breast and prostate cancer within families.
 
The findings — by Jennifer L. Beebe-Dimmer of the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit — are based on analysis of the medical charts of 78,171 women tracked between 1993 and 1998.
 
Over the course of the study, which ended in 2009, 3,506 of the women were diagnosed with breast cancer. The researchers found those whose fathers, brothers, or sons developed prostate cancer were 14 percent more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer.
 
What’s more, a family history of both breast and prostate cancer was linked with a 78 percent increase in breast cancer risk, and were highest among African-American women.
 
"The increase in breast cancer risk associated with having a positive family history of prostate cancer is modest; however, women with a family history of both breast and prostate cancer among first-degree relatives have an almost 2-fold increase in risk of breast cancer," said Beebe-Dimmer.
 
"These findings are important in that they can be used to support an approach by clinicians to collect a complete family history of all cancers — particularly among first degree relatives — in order to assess patient risk for developing cancer. Families with clustering of different tumors may be particularly important to study in order to discover new genetic mutations to explain this clustering."

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Women whose families have a history of prostate cancer may face greater risks for developing breast cancer, according to new research suggesting a common genetic link.
prostate, breast, cancer, gene, links
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2015-45-09
Monday, 09 March 2015 03:45 PM
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