Tags: Cancer | drink | raises | breast | cancer | risk | AICR

One Drink a Day Raises Breast Cancer Risk

One Drink a Day Raises Breast Cancer Risk
(Copyright DPC)

By    |   Tuesday, 23 May 2017 11:10 AM

Drinking just one alcoholic drink a day increases the risk for breast cancer, says a major new report by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF).

But the report also revealed for the first time that vigorous exercise, such as running or cycling, reduces the risk of risk of both pre- and post-menopausal breast cancers. The study's results confirmed earlier reports that moderate exercise decreases the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer, the most common type of breast cancer.

"It can be confusing with single studies when the findings get swept back and forth," said  Dr. Anne McTiernan, a lead author of the report and cancer prevention expert at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

"With this comprehensive and up-to-date report the evidence is clear: Having a physically active lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight throughout life and limiting alcohol — these are all steps women can take to lower their risk."

The report analyzed 119 studies, including data on 12 million women and 260,000 cases of breast cancer.

It found strong evidence that drinking the equivalent of a small glass of wine or beer a day containing about 10 grams of alcohol, increases pre-menopausal breast cancer risk by 5 percent and post-menopausal breast cancer risk by 9 percent. (A "standard" drink is a small 5-ounce glass of wine or a 12-ounce beer and both contain about 14 grams of alcohol.)

Pre-menopausal women who exercised the most vigorously lowered their risk of breast cancer by 17 percent, and post-menopausal women who were the most active lowered their risk by 10 percent.

Moderate activity, such as walking and gardening, lowered risk by 13 percent when comparing the most versus least active women.

The report also found that being overweight or obese increases the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer, but that breastfeeding lowers risk.

Diet also had an impact on risk, although evidence was limited. Non-starchy vegetables appeared to lower risk for estrogen-receptor (ER) negative breast cancers, which are more difficult to treat.

The report also found limited evidence that diets high in dairy, calcium, and foods containing carotenoids (carrots, spinach, and kale) also lowered cancer risk.

"These links are intriguing but more research is needed, said McTiernan. "The findings indicate that women may get some benefit from including more non-starchy vegetables with high variety, including foods that contain carotenoids," she said. "That can also help avoid the common 1 to 2 pounds women are gaining every year, which is key for lowering cancer risk."

The good news is that all women can take steps to lower their breast cancer risk, says Alice Bender, AICR's Head of Nutrition Programs. "Wherever you are with physical activity, try to nudge it up a bit, either a little longer or a little harder," she said.

"Make simple food shifts to boost protection — substitute veggies like carrots, bell peppers or green salad for chips and crackers and if you drink alcohol, stick to a single drink or less.

"There are no guarantees when it comes to cancer, but it's empowering to know you can do something to lower your risk," Bender said.

Another recent study, this one from the University of Missouri-Columbia, found that a natural compound called luteolin may help reduce the risk of triple-negative breast cancers spreading. Luteolin is a flavonoid found in herbs such as thyme and parsley, and in vegetables such as celery and broccoli.

Unlike most breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, which includes up to 25 percent of all breast tumors, is especially deadly because it is difficult to treat, and often spreads to other areas of the body.

"Mice exposed to human triple-negative breast cancer cells experienced significantly reduced metastastic growth in their lungs after being treated with luteolin," said  researcher Salman Hyder. "In almost every case, the mice also saw no weight loss, which means luteolin has no toxic effects; this plant compound is both safe and effective."

© 2021 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
Drinking just one alcoholic drink a day increases the risk for breast cancer, says a major new report by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF).But the report also revealed for the first time that vigorous exercise, such...
drink, raises, breast, cancer, risk, AICR, WCRF
653
2017-10-23
Tuesday, 23 May 2017 11:10 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 
Newsmax TV Live

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved