Tags: Alzheimer's/Dementia | estrogen | patch | Alzheimers | risk | menopausal | women

Estrogen Patch May Cut Alzheimer's Risk for Newly Postmenopausal Women: Study

Estrogen Patch May Cut Alzheimer's Risk for Newly Postmenopausal Women: Study
(Copyright DPC)

Monday, 18 July 2016 08:40 AM

Estrogen patches, used as hormone therapy for newly postmenopausal women, could cut the risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to an American study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

This new study could influence the decision of menopausal women when choosing a type of hormone therapy.

Levels of the female sex hormone estrogen fall rapidly at the menopause, defined as occurring when a woman has gone a full 12 months without a menstrual period. The hormone can be administered to menopausal women by means of a patch. Such patches have now been found to reduce beta-amyloid deposits, a kind of sticky plaque typically found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.

Kejal Kantarci and a team of researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, USA, studied 68 women aged between 42 to 59. All the women were five to 36 months past menopause, which represents a critical window of rapid estrogen depletion. The scientists gave 21 of the participants a 17beta-Estradiol estrogen skin patch, 17 were given estrogen orally and 30 were given a placebo.

The team wanted to investigate whether very early treatment could be beneficial to women, since starting hormone therapy later down the line (from age 65) has been seen to have negative effects. The scientists thought that younger women in better health would respond more favorably to menopausal hormone therapy.

The results revealed lower levels of beta-amyloid deposits in women given the patch compared to those given the placebo. The effect was even more notable in women carrying the APOE e4 gene, which is known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's. No reduction in beta-amyloid deposits was seen in women who took estrogen orally.

Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to the progressive and irreversible destruction of neurons.

To help keep the brain in shape, doctors recommend stabilizing blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes, as well as quitting smoking and staying physically active. People who are curious and inquisitive, with an active social life, and with low levels of stress are less affected by the disease. A healthy and balanced diet also has a role to play, with sufficient intake antioxidants (from fruit and vegetables, for example), omega 3 (oily fish) and glucose. Staying hydrated is important too.

© AFP/Relaxnews 2019

   
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Estrogen patches, used as hormone therapy for newly postmenopausal women, could cut the risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to an American study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. This new study could influence the decision of menopausal women when choosing...
estrogen, patch, Alzheimers, risk, menopausal, women
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2016-40-18
Monday, 18 July 2016 08:40 AM
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