Tags: muscle | seniors | aging | weakness

Fifth of Seniors Suffer From Muscle Weakness

By    |   Thursday, 29 January 2015 04:28 PM

A national survey on muscle strength in older Americans finds that nearly a fifth have less strength than is considered normal.

Muscle strength is considered important to seniors because it helps them avoid debilitating falls, live independently, and is associated with overall good health. 
 
According to researchers from the Centers for Disease Control, the national, cross-sectional survey, which included a grip test, showed the following findings:
 
  • Eighteen percent of adults age 60 and over had either weak or reduced muscle strength. Of this, 5 percent had weak strength, while 13 percent had intermediate (reduced) muscle strength, and 82 percent were normal. 
  • As you would expect, muscle strength loss increased with age. Ninety percent of people between the ages 60-79 had normal strength, but by the age of 80 this figure had declined to less than half (47 percent). 
  • Muscle strength loss among men and women did not differ up until age 80, when women lost more strength. 
  • As people became weaker, they experienced more difficulty getting out of an armless chair. Fifty-five percent of those with weak strength reported difficulty rising from an armless chair, compared with 26 percent of those with reduced strength, and 13 percent of those with normal strength. 
  • Non-Hispanic Asian and Hispanic persons had a higher prevalence of reduced muscle strength than non-Hispanic white persons.
 

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A national survey on muscle strength in older Americans finds that nearly a fifth have less strength than is considered normal. Muscle strength is considered important to seniors because it helps them avoid debilitating falls, live independently, and is associated with...
muscle, seniors, aging, weakness
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2015-28-29
Thursday, 29 January 2015 04:28 PM
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