Tags: Coronavirus | Health Topics | virus | doctors | pandemic

How Doctors Protect Themselves Against Coronavirus

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By    |   Tuesday, 14 April 2020 12:11 PM

Americans are virtually homebound to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Social distancing has become the new norm and even doctors are trying to practice it.

Dr. Stephen Sinatra, the well-known cardiologist and author of "Health Revelations From Heaven and Earth," tells Newsmax that he's in the same situation as the rest of us and that social distancing seems to be "the best temporary measure for protecting the mass population in the absence of universal testing."

"I personally am Skyping more than ever with family," he says. "Especially to my grandchildren who were supposed to come and visit this month. Reaching out regularly to friends and family by phone or computers is one way to nurture those vital connections."

Other experts, like Dr. Gabe Mirkin, M.D., author of "The Healthy Heart Miracle," says that exercise, along with an anti-inflammatory diet, are key factors in reducing our risk of COVID-19 infections and complications.

"My wife and I ride our bikes from 1-3 hours daily and don't go near anyone when we pedal," he tells Newsmax.

Dr. Ellen Kamhi, author of "The Natural Medicine Chest," says she's using her isolation as a "mini-retreat" paying attention to the flora and fauna in her neighborhood.

And Dr. Joseph Maroon, M.D., the noted neurosurgeon and author of "Square One: A Simple Guide to A Balanced Life," tells Newsmax that besides exercise, eating right, and taking supplements, he prays or meditates for 20 minutes daily.

Other immune-boosting tips from these experts include:

  1. Get adequate rest. "Too much activity and not enough rest is a ticket for trouble," Sinatra says. "Many studies show that inadequate sleep suppresses the immune system."
  2. Minimize stress. Worry, anxiety, anger, depression, or any emotional conflict drain the immune system. "A major 2012 study found that people with chronic stress are more likely to develop persistent cold symptoms than stress-free individuals," says Sinatra.
  3. Take supplements. Maroon personally takes 5000 IU of vitamin D3, 1000 mg. vitamin C, and three grams of fish oil containing EPA and DHA daily.
  4. Decrease sugar consumption. Dr. Mirkin recommends not eating processed meats, meat, foods with added sugar, processed foods and fried foods. "Instead, drink lots of water and huge amounts of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, seeds and nuts," he says.
  5. Eat chicken soup. Dr. Ellen Kamhi says, "Grandmothers around the world can't be wrong, and there are scientific studies that attest to the fact that the ingredients in chicken soup appear to have an anti-inflammatory effect." For even more flu-fighting power, add chopped garlic to your homemade chicken soup, says Sinatra.
  6. Take vitamin C. This crucial vitamin made famous by Nobel prize winner Dr. Linus Pauling has been studied for its support during health challenges such as the common cold as well as its ability to support the immune system. According to Newsweek, large doses of vitamin C are being administered to patients in intensive care who were being tested positive for COVID-19.

© 2020 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


   
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Americans are virtually homebound to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Social distancing has become the new norm and even doctors are trying to practice it.
virus, doctors, pandemic
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2020-11-14
Tuesday, 14 April 2020 12:11 PM
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