Tags: Jeffrey Epstein | epstein | suicide | conspiracy | theories | trump

Epstein Death Sparks Round of Murder Conspiracy Theories

Epstein Death Sparks Round of Murder Conspiracy Theories

Sunday, 11 August 2019 01:45 PM

Jeffrey Epstein's apparent suicide Saturday morning in a federal jail launched new conspiracy theories online in a saga that has provided fodder for them for years, fueled by Epstein's ties to princes, politicians and other famous and powerful people.

Online theorists Saturday quickly offered unsubstantiated speculation — including some retweeted by President Donald Trump — that Epstein's death wasn't a suicide, or it was faked.

That chatter picked up on the conjecture that resurged after Epstein's July 6 arrest on allegations that he orchestrated a sex-trafficking ring designed to bring him teenage girls. Some of his accusers have described being sexually abused by the wealthy financier's friends and acquaintances.

"People close to Epstein, noting that he seemed recently to be in good spirits, were surprised by reports of suicide, according to one person familiar with their discussions Saturday, and expressed concern about the possibility of foul play," according to The Washington Post.

"There's no way that man could have killed himself," a former Metropolitan Correction Center (MCC) inmate told the N.Y. Post. "I've done too much time in those units. It's an impossibility."

The combination created fertile ground for theories and misinformation to breed on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Epstein, 66, had been denied bail and faced up to 45 years behind bars on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges unsealed last month. He had pleaded not guilty and was awaiting trial next year.

His relationships with President Donald Trump, former President Bill Clinton and Britain's Prince Andrew were at the center of those online rumors and theories, many of which question what politicians knew about Epstein's alleged sex crimes.

Others theories, however, have been easily debunked.

For example, days after his arrest online memes and Facebook statuses wrongly claimed the Obama administration, in order to protect former President Clinton, forged a once-secret deal in 2008 in Florida that allowed him to plead guilty to soliciting a minor for prostitution to avoid more serious charges. The deal was actually executed before President Barack Obama took office , under former President George W. Bush.

Meanwhile, a manipulated photo, shared by thousands on Twitter and Facebook, falsely claimed to show Epstein with Trump and a young Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter.

Both Clinton and Trump have denied being privy to Epstein's alleged scheme.

Clinton spokesman Angel Ureña said the former president "knows nothing about the terrible crimes Jeffrey Epstein pleaded guilty to in Florida some years ago, or those with which he has been recently charged in New York." He said that, in 2002 and 2003, Clinton took four trips on Epstein's plane with multiple stops and that staff and his Secret Service detail traveled on every leg.

Trump has acknowledged knowing Epstein but said he "had a falling out with him a long time ago."

Other Epstein theories floating online have been darker, especially after Epstein was found injured on the floor of his cell last month with bruises on his neck. Some online commentators described it as a "murder attempt."

"Men in high places want Epstein dead," one Twitter use wrote.

Hours after Epstein's death Saturday, as the hashtag #EpsteinMurder was trending worldwide on Twitter, the president joined Twitter speculation around Epstein's death while under the federal government's watch.

But some experts pointed out that Epstein's suicide isn't that uncommon for those accused of certain heinous crimes.

"Pedophiles facing federal criminal charges are at high risk for suicide," tweeted former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. "It happened in several of my Maryland cases when defendants were released on bail. Detained pedophiles require special attention. Stopping people from harming themselves is difficult."

Rosenstein's reminder is fact-based, but conspiracy theorists might just see it as another cover, because the self-suicide answer is not yet readily accepted.

"Authorities couldn't keep Epstein alive by putting him under 24 hour surveillance?" MSNBC's Joe Scarborough tweeted, fanning the conspiracy flame. How convenient for a lot of rich and powerful men.

Adding: "A guy who had information that would have destroyed rich and powerful men's lives ends up dead in his jail cell. How predictably...Russian."

And: "Powerful Democratic and Republican figures breathing a huge sigh of relief — as well as a Harvard professor or two."

Trump, who rose to conservative prominence by falsely claiming Obama wasn't born in the U.S., retweeted unsubstantiated claims about Epstein's death.

When asked on "Fox News Sunday" about the president's retweet, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway said, "I think the president just wants everything to be investigated."

She also said "it's not for me to go further than where the DOJ and FBI are right now," though that's what Trump appeared to be doing in his retweet.

Other politicians also took to social media to question the circumstances.

Republican Sen. Rick Scott of Florida, the state where some of Epstein's alleged sexual abuse crimes took place, suggested the possibility that others might have been involved in Epstein's death when he called on corrections officials to explain what happened at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan.

"The Federal Bureau of Prisons must provide answers on what systemic failures of the MCC Manhattan or criminal acts allowed this coward to deny justice to his victims," he tweeted.

Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, now an attorney for Trump, tweeted out several questions about Epstein's death.

"Who was watching? What does camera show? ... Follow the motives" Giuliani tweeted Saturday afternoon.

The FBI and the Department of Justice's Office of the Inspector General will investigate the circumstances surrounding Epstein's death, Attorney General William Barr said.

"Mr. Epstein's death raises serious questions that must be answered," Barr said in a news release.

Epstein's suicide was likely recorded by jail cameras, according to Preet Bharara, the former federal prosecutor in Manhattan.

"One hopes it is complete, conclusive, and secured," he tweeted.

Epstein's arrest last month launched separate investigations into how authorities handled his case initially when similar charges were first brought against him in Florida more than a decade ago. U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta resigned last month after coming under fire for overseeing that deal when he was U.S. attorney in Miami.

Epstein's lawyers maintained that the new charges in New York were covered by the 2008 plea deal and that Epstein hadn't had any illicit contact with underage girls since serving his 13-month sentence in Florida.

© Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

   
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Jeffrey Epstein's apparent suicide Saturday morning in a federal jail launched new conspiracy theories online in a saga that has provided fodder for them for years, fueled by Epstein's ties to princes, politicians and other famous and powerful people.Online theorists...
epstein, suicide, conspiracy, theories, trump
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2019-45-11
Sunday, 11 August 2019 01:45 PM
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