Tags: Coronavirus | coronavirus | domesticviolence

How to Help COVID-19 Domestic Abuse Victims

un secretary general antonio guterres
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

By    |   Wednesday, 16 September 2020 12:20 PM

The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a dramatic increase in cases of domestic violence reported around the world. Experts said that isolation and quarantine exacerbated existing conditions that placed people at increased risk for sexual, emotional, and physical abuse from romantic partners and family members.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Gutteres made a public appeal in April to end “the horrifying global surge in domestic violence”, according to ABC. “For many women and girls, the threat looms largest where they should be safest — in their own homes,” Gutteres said. “And so, I make an appeal today for peace at home — and in homes — around the world.”

The Australian government reported a whopping 75% increase in online searches for support on domestic violence, and a French minister said domestic violence rose 32% across France and 36% in Paris in one week, according to ABC.

According to the Independent, reports from China indicate that domestic abuse tripled as victims were locked in, unable to reach safety. In Italy, an Italian medical student was allegedly strangled to death by her boyfriend because he thought she had given him the coronavirus. The Baltimore Sun reported that domestic violence calls increased by 25% this March over calls received in March last year. The domestic violence calls increased directly as the coronavirus pandemic exploded, says the Sun.

According to The Conversation, a recent study of Filipino women caught in a web of domestic violence found that the support of family and friends provided the “key to ending domestic violence and plays a role that is distinct from what service professional provide.”

The researchers focused on Filipino women because of their unique risk for domestic violence due to racial and cultural considerations, they said. Psychology professor Krista M. Chronister, one of the study authors, said that she has seen family members help stop cycles of violence in her 20 years of work in the field.

“Foremost, they tried to stay connected with their loves ones, partners and children using phone, text, social media, visits to their work and home and taking them out socially,” she wrote in an article for The Conversation. “Family and friends also created larger networks of people to watch over their loved ones, communicate about their needs, and get resources to help them.”

Chronister said that by “engaging family and friends, we can build larger, inspired communities committed to ending domestic violence.”

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The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a dramatic increase in cases of domestic violence reported around the world. Experts said that isolation and quarantine exacerbated existing conditions that placed people at increased risk for sexual, emotional, and physical abuse from...
coronavirus, domesticviolence
398
2020-20-16
Wednesday, 16 September 2020 12:20 PM
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