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Dr. Alveda King to Newsmax: MLK Would Not Support Obamacare

By    |   Wednesday, 28 August 2013 07:57 PM

Dr. Alveda King, niece of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., tells Newsmax TV that her uncle would not have supported Obamacare if it meant providing contraception and abortion services to American women.

Speaking on the 50th anniversary of her uncle's iconic "I Have a Dream" speech, King was reacting to a radio interview by President Barack Obama in which he said the civil rights leader would "like" his signature Affordable Care Act "because I think he understood that healthcare, health security, is not a privilege. It's something that in a country as wealthy as ours, everybody should have access to."

Editor's Note: 22 Hidden Taxes and Fees Set to Hit You With Obamacare. Read the Guide to Protect Yourself.

King, a Newsmax contributor, disagreed with the president's characterization of her famous uncle.

“I know Martin Luther King, Jr. would have been unhappy about certain aspects of Obamacare,” she said in an exclusive interview on Wednesday. “I don't believe my uncle would be wanting his little girls when they were little — or his granddaughter— now to be given free birth control.”

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King, a pastoral associate and director of African American outreach with Priests for Life and Gospel of Life Ministries, insisted that MLK would have preferred to see the government spend money on more pressing needs for his daughters and granddaughter.

“He would rather her have help for education and housing and jobs when she grew up, those kinds of things,” according to King. “So that free birth control and access to abortions, I don't believe that my uncle would have wanted that for his little granddaughter.”

She said, however, that her uncle probably would not have been surprised to see an African-American elected to the highest office in the land.

“He would have thought that that might happen one day because as a dream, for him, nothing was impossible,” she explained. “I doubt that he would be totally surprised; he would be very prayerful.”

Last Saturday some 200,000 people turned out in Washington, D.C. to recreate MLK’s historic March on Washington, while bells rang out in the nation’s capital and across the land at 3 p.m. on Wednesday — the same time MLK stirred a nation divided by race and turned the tide of the civil rights struggle when he challenged Americans to judge his four children by something other than the color of their skin and to “let freedom ring.”

King said her mother, Naomi, who attended the 1963 march, was among the family members who stood at the base of the Lincoln Memorial as a bell that once rang out over the 16th street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. was struck during the anniversary celebration.

The church was bombed on Sept. 15, 1963 as part of the civil rights struggle, claiming the lives of a number of children.

“As I watched my mother who attended that march 50 years ago stand there as that bell was ringing, I really promise you I was majorly blessed to have her still here and to have excitement return,” observed King, whose childhood home was also firebombed. “My heart is stirred and my heart is encouraged.”

King’s original song, “Let Freedom Ring,” was also performed as part of the anniversary festivities.

“When I heard that ‘let freedom ring, let freedom ring, and thank God that King had a dream,’ I was very encouraged. I really was,” explained King.

Editor's Note: 22 Hidden Taxes and Fees Set to Hit You With Obamacare. Read the Guide to Protect Yourself.

While MLK made it a policy not to publicly endorse any U.S. political party or candidate, African Americans historically have leaned more toward the Democratic Party in the decades that followed.

That may once again change, according to King, who said that a number of African-Americans left the Republican Party when President John F. Kennedy, who was a Democrat, took office.

“I tell people I'm an independent Republican because I still am very much a conservative and I vote Republican,” she explained. “I believe we're going to see an emergence of African-American conservatives. And we're growing — and you are going to hear more from us.”

She said that her uncle believed he was called by God to be a prophet.

“When he began to speak with that prophetic voice, ‘I Have a Dream,’ ‘The Mountain Top,’ you can't have experiences like that and hear from God without knowing that God is calling you to speak for him,” she said. “A prophet is simply one who hears from God and speaks what God says. And it takes a lot of courage to do that.”






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Dr. Alveda King, niece of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., tells Newsmax TV that her uncle would not have supported Obamacare if it meant providing contraception and abortion services to American women.
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Wednesday, 28 August 2013 07:57 PM
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