Tags: Koch | political | company | finances

Charles Koch: It's 'Ludicrous' to Believe Political Work Is Tied to Company Finances

By    |   Monday, 27 April 2015 01:00 PM

Some critics complain that the political activity of conservative Koch Industries chieftains Charles and David Koch is somehow designed to boost the company's finances.

"We are doing all of this to make more money?" Charles Koch asks rhetorically to USA Today. "I mean, that is so ludicrous." The true aim of the Kochs' efforts to aid Republican causes is to "increase well-being in society," he says.

"I don't know how they [the naysayers] can say that with a straight face," he said. "We oppose as many or more things that would benefit us than would hurt us," he notes.

For example, Koch's Minnesota oil refinery might suffer if the Keystone XL pipeline supported by the Kochs is built, and the company might lose out if the Export-Import Bank is eliminated, another cause the Kochs support.

Charles Koch explains the company is increasing its publicity efforts to "defend ourselves from attacks and make our employees feel better about the company." It also wants to make sure customers and suppliers know "we're not this evil ogre trying to make your lives worse."

It would be interesting to see if Koch agrees with any of the ideas voiced by liberal former Labor Secretary Robert Reich, who says Americans feel more and more powerless amid consolidation in both the corporate and government sectors.

"The companies we work for, the businesses we buy from and the political system we participate in all seem to have grown less accountable," Reich writes on his blog.

"A large part of the reason is we have fewer choices than we used to have. In almost every area of our lives, it's now take it or leave it."

In the job market, "companies are treating workers as disposable cogs because most working people have no choice," writes Reich, now a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley. "They need work and must take what they can get."

On the consumer side, consolidation among big companies curbs our selections, he explains.

"Finally, as voters we feel no one is listening because politicians, too, face less and less competition," Reich writes. "Over 85 percent of congressional districts are considered safe for their incumbents in the upcoming 2016 election; only 3 percent are toss-ups."

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Some critics complain that the political activity of conservative Koch Industries chieftains Charles and David Koch is somehow designed to boost the company's finances.
Koch, political, company, finances
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2015-00-27
Monday, 27 April 2015 01:00 PM
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