Tags: uber | driverless | cars | ride share

The Legal Truth About Uber and Self-Driving Cars

The Legal Truth About Uber and Self-Driving Cars

(AP/Michael Probst)

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Friday, 21 October 2016 12:42 PM Current | Bio | Archive



Moses Martinez isn’t too worried about his job as an Uber shared-ride driver if automated cars are launched nationwide.


The San Antonio, Texas based driver has already applied to work with Amazon Flex, which maintains a warehouse in Schertz.


“If hired, I would be a contract delivery driver that picks up and delivers merchandise that people purchase on Amazon.com,” Martinez told Newsmax Finance.


Martinez is among the 160,000 Uber drivers across the nation, according to DMR, who stand to lose their jobs if self driving cars are successful.
 

The idea of driverless cars taking over the roads is not so far fetched.
 

Uber recently launched 100 driverless cars in Pittsburgh as part of a pilot program with Carnegie Mellon University.
 

“If ride sharing companies pursue an autonomous model, they will no longer require drivers and current drivers will have no rights that will pose a hurdle to bringing that future to the present,” Aaron H. Jacoby, managing partner with the Arent Fox law firm in Los Angeles. “I do not know of any long term or union-type agreements that will stand in the way of that progress.”
 

It’s a good thing Martinez plans to move on if his position with Uber is replaced by a robotized car because successful litigation is unlikely in the area of employment contracts.
 

“This model of remote jobs or the gig economy is a core example of the sharing economy that is starting to mature,” said Mark Skilton, professor of practice with Warwick Business School in the UK and an expert on technology. “People and regulators are increasingly wising up.”
 

Lawsuits around driverless car accidents, however, are more likely.
 

“The challenge presented is whether these machines are safe enough for our society,” said Joseph Barrett, a consumer attorney with Layfield & Barrett. “That’s where the real legal issue is going to be.”
 

Rather than driver error as part of a personal injury claim involving an automated car accident, lawyers will be trying to prove software error.
 

“Litigation is likely to be more along the lines of the electronic transmission of information,” Barrett said.
 

Eventually, all devices Americans use from cars to wearable devices will be connected to the internet, according to report by Allianz called A Guide to Cyber Risk: Managing The Impact of Increasing Interconnectivity.
 

“Predictions suggest that a trillion devices will be connected by 2020, which could lead to a significant increase in cyber vulnerability,” said Rishi Baviskar, senior cyber risk consultant with Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty.
 

While self driving cars would undoubtedly make the lives of Americans easier, such artificial intelligence coupled with interconnectivity could also potentially increase the threat and impact of cyber risk.
 

“We’ll be potentially litigating about a failure to prevent some form of cyber hacking that changed the way a vehicle behaves,” said Barrett.

 

Juliette Fairley is an author, lecturer and TV host based in New York.

© 2019 Newsmax Finance. All rights reserved.

   
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JulietteFairley
While self driving cars would undoubtedly make the lives of Americans easier, such artificial intelligence coupled with interconnectivity could also potentially increase the threat and impact of cyber risk.
uber, driverless, cars, ride share
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2016-42-21
Friday, 21 October 2016 12:42 PM
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