Tags: Disaster Planning | tornado alley | expanding | signs

5 Signs 'Tornado Alley' Is Expanding

By    |   Friday, 08 Jul 2016 01:32 AM

Traditionally, "Tornado Alley" was a path that stretched from northern Texas through Oklahoma, Kansas, and much of Nebraska, ending with the eastern half of South Dakota.

Here are some signs that tornado alley may be expanding beyond its former borders in recent years or may have been larger than suspected all along.

1. Frequency of tornados outside "Tornado Alley."

A 2012 CoreLogic study of tornado patterns reported in USA Today used weather data from 1980 to 2009 to suggest that tornado activity has shifted significantly eastward into Ohio, Georgia, and even Florida.

The Emergency Radio Every Family Must Have — Special FREE Offer

In total, at least 26 states have extreme tornado risk in at least one area. 

2. A new look at old data.

An infographic published by The Huffington Post showed that the top 5 deadliest tornado incidents in United States history occurred outside of "Tornado Alley," and only one of the top 10 occurred there (in Oklahoma).

Some of the reason for higher death tolls may be attributed to higher population in these areas, rather than the strength or frequency of the tornados, however.

3. Changes in weather patterns.

A 2014 study in Geophysical Research Letters was cited by Vice Media's Motherboard channel that reported that spring storms were beginning two weeks earlier in the Great Plains states than they did 50 years ago.

Scientists also concluded that climate change had made winter and spring warmer, which impacted the jet stream and caused storms to form earlier and more north, even up into the Saskatchewan region of Canada.

Special: Terror Chatter High, Get Your FREE Emergency Radio Now

4.
Stronger tornados are becoming more frequent.

A look at the occurrence of F3- to F5-scale tornadoes, the strongest being F5 shows the areas with the greatest frequency inside many different states, including Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Indiana — none of which are inside the traditional boundaries of "Tornado Alley."

InvestmentWatch mapped the appearance of severe tornados, which centered over Oklahoma in the second half of the 20th century, while the area encompassed by severe tornadoes stretched far into the eastern part of the country. 

5. More severe storms outside the usual peak tornado season.

TheWeatherPrediction.com noted that of the 16 fatal tornado events in the Midwest in the beginning of the 2000s, half occurred outside the usual tornado season of March to June.

This evidence showed that tornados may have been as predictable as once thought. 

Free Emergency Radio Is Yours, Get It Before It's Too Late! Just Pay S/H— Click Here

Related Stories:

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Traditionally, tornado alley was a path that stretched from northern Texas through Oklahoma, Kansas, and much of Nebraska, ending with the eastern half of South Dakota. Here are some signs that tornado alley may be expanding beyond its former borders in recent years.
tornado alley, expanding, signs
440
2016-32-08
Friday, 08 Jul 2016 01:32 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved