Tags: High Blood Pressure | systolic | blood pressure | normal

Systolic Pressure: What's Ideal for Normal Blood Pressure

By    |   Thursday, 16 Jun 2016 04:28 PM

Blood pressure readings include both a systolic reading and a diastolic reading. Understanding the importance of each and what is within the normal range can help you manage your blood pressure more effectively.

Blood pressure measurements are expressed with two numbers like a fraction. For example, the measurement could be 120/80. The top number in the pair is the systolic reading. The bottom reading is called the diastolic measurement.

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Blood pressure is measured using an instrument called a sphygmomanometer, a simple cuff that is attached to a pressure gauge. A stethoscope is also used during the blood pressure test to listen to the blood moving through the arteries.

The practitioner will inflate the cuff to a pressure believed to be higher than your systolic reading, and as the cuff deflates, a whooshing sound is produced as blood rushes through the artery. This is the systolic pressure.

Blood pressure is measured in milligrams of mercury (mm Hg), explains WebMD.

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The American Heart Association explains that systolic pressure is the amount of pressure within the arteries when the heart muscle contracts, or during a heartbeat. The diastolic number represents the amount of pressure in the arteries during the time when the heart muscle is resting and refilling with blood in preparation for the next beat.

A normal systolic blood pressure reading is below 120, says WebMD. A reading between 120 and 139 indicates prehypertension or borderline high blood pressure. A systolic pressure of 140 or greater means high blood pressure. If the systolic reading tops 180, the American Heart Association says this is a hypertensive crisis requiring immediate emergency medical intervention.

It is normal for blood pressure to fluctuate to some degree, and the American Heart Association points out that a single high systolic reading doesn’t necessarily mean you have high blood pressure. Instead, the pattern is watched over time. If systolic readings stay over 140 in a given period of time, your physician will likely prescribe lifestyle changes and, if necessary, blood pressure medications.

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Blood pressure readings include both a systolic reading and a diastolic reading. Understanding the importance of each and what is within the normal range can help you manage your blood pressure more effectively.
systolic, blood pressure, normal
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2016-28-16
Thursday, 16 Jun 2016 04:28 PM
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