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Myths About Retiring in Colorado

By    |   Tuesday, 02 Jun 2015 01:31 AM

If you're thinking about retirement and Colorado is on your radar, you need to consider the drawbacks as well as the advantages. Maybe you get altitude sickness and are concerned about acclimating to a high-altitude city. Maybe you really prefer the ocean to the mountains. There are reasons to think twice, but there are also a lot of myths about retirement in Colorado. Here are a few to lay to rest.

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  1. Colorado Has Very Harsh Winters
 - Some mountainous areas of Colorado do get a lot of snowfall – but there are a lot of areas, like Pueblo, that for the most part, have mild winters where the temperature rarely drops below 30 degrees Fahrenheit.

  2. Colorado Has Blistering Summers
 - Colorado has a lot of desert areas. Deserts get hot. Barring a heat wave, however, many parts of the state enjoy summers that rarely see the temperature go above 80 F.

  3. Most of the Affordable Places in Colorado are Full of College Kids
 - While it's true that places like Colorado Springs and Fort Collins are college towns, they also have a lot to offer to Baby Boomers, including other retirees in increasing numbers.

  4. How Soon Can You Retire? Free Test Shows You When — Click Here

  5. Nothing Necessary is Close By - Many nonresidents think that when it comes to Colorado, the nice areas are far from civilization, and the services retirees need, such as medical care, are a long drive away. Granted, if you want to really get away and isolate yourself from civilization, you can pull it off in Colorado. However, you can live in a town or small city and still live close to nature. Grand Junction, overlooking Colorado National Monument, or Fort Collins in the Rocky Mountain foothills are both great examples. 
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  6. Colorado Has Lots of Nature, But Little Culture
 - In addition to the state's rich cultural history, it's cities and towns offer cultural experiences, including theater, art, and symphony. Even a small affordable city like Greeley is an arts hub, thanks to its proximity to the University of Northern Colorado. 
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  7. Altitude Issues - While it may take a little time to acclimate, living at a high altitude is not bad for you. In fact, Colorado's high-altitude regions have impressive longevity ratings, with a low rate of cardiac deaths and some cancers. However, be sure to wear sunscreen – high altitudes means higher exposure to ultraviolet rays.


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If you're thinking about retirement and Colorado is on your radar, you need to consider the drawbacks as well as the advantages. Maybe you get altitude sickness and are concerned about acclimating to a high-altitude city.
retirement, Colorado, myths
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2015-31-02
Tuesday, 02 Jun 2015 01:31 AM
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