Tags: Digestive Problems | probiotics | nausea

Probiotics and Nausea: What You Need to Know

By    |   Wednesday, 26 Aug 2015 05:03 PM

Research is finding numerous positive benefits to taking probiotics, but new users should also be prepared for potential side effects like nausea and gas pain, although they rarely occur.

"Probiotics are living microorganisms, carrying with them inherent unpredictability in how they might interact with you as their host and the other indigenous microbiotica presently in your gastrointestinal tract," according to LiveStrong. "Mild symptoms are experienced by some, particularly if probiotics are not introduced incrementally, including gastrointestinal upset, such as gas, abdominal pain and bloating."

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Everyday Health reported that most symptoms experienced by someone taking probiotics are temporary, and said anyone experiencing consistent gastrointestinal upset could switch to a different probiotic strain as each affects the body in different ways.

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health said side effects for most people will be mild, but individuals should talk to their healthcare providers before taking them. In some cases, side effects could be more severe.

"The people who are most at risk of severe side effects include critically ill patients, those who have had surgery, very sick infants, and people with weakened immune systems," the NCCIH said.

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The center said more studies looking closely at safety of probiotics need to be done, particularly as different bacteria strains become more popular. "Most of our knowledge about safety comes from studies of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium; less is known about other probiotics," the website said. "Information on the long-term safety of probiotics is limited, and safety may differ from one type of probiotic to another. For example, even though a National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)-funded study showed that a particular kind of Lactobacillus appears safe in healthy adults age 65 and older, this does not mean that all probiotics would necessarily be safe for people in this age group."

As always, consult your medical provider before adding any supplement or medicine to your regimen.

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Research is finding numerous positive benefits to taking probiotics, but new users should also be prepared for potential side effects like nausea and gas pain, although they rarely occur.
probiotics, nausea
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2015-03-26
Wednesday, 26 Aug 2015 05:03 PM
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