Tags: Gun Control | Missouri | hunting | private lands

Hunting in Missouri: 5 Things to Know About Hunting on Private Lands

By    |   Tuesday, 02 Jun 2015 11:31 AM

When applying for a hunting or trapping permit in Missouri, the state makes it clear that holding that permit does not allow one to gain access to private land without permission from the landowner. It's important for hunters to be knowledgeable about about guidelines regarding access to private lands.

"Remember that your behavior reflects on all hunters and trappers," writes the Missouri Department of Conservation. "Respect the rights of private landowners."

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Here are five things sportsmen should know before hunting on private lands in Missouri.

1. In 2008, 93 percent of Missouri's hunting areas were privately owned, and "most of the opportunities to hunt as well as the quantity and quality of available wildlife habitat depend on the attitudes and management practices of private landowners," University of Missouri researchers wrote.

Most Missourians live within a one-hour drives of one of the state's conservation areas, national forests or wildlife refuges where deer hunting is allowed. Still, many choose to lease land from private landowners.

2. The state requires lessees of private lands to follow all hunting regulations regarding season dates, hunting methods, limits, and tagging and checking requirements, according to the Department of Conservation.

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3. Missouri residents hunting or trapping on lands they own can do so without a permit, with the exception of deer, turkey and waterfowl. They must comply with hunting regulations for such things as appropriate seasons, methods, limits and checking requirements. Those hunting waterfowl, deer or turkey need a specific stamp or permit to hunt even on land they own.

4. To qualify for a landowner permit, which would allow one to hunt for deer and turkey, a Missouri resident needs to own, lease or be a general partner in a partnership of at least five continuous acres of land in the state. Any immediate household member who's at least 6 years old also would be allowed to receive a landowner permit.

5. Hunters who get permission to hunt on private lands should respect the landowners. The DOC recommends leaving gates as you find them, reporting any damage seen on the property, inviting landowners on the hunt and sharing game.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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When applying for a hunting or trapping permit in Missouri, the state makes it clear that holding that permit does not allow one to gain access to private land without permission from the landowner.
Missouri, hunting, private lands
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2015-31-02
Tuesday, 02 Jun 2015 11:31 AM
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