Tags: Gun Control | Michigan | hunting | urban

Hunting in Michigan: 4 Things to Know About Urban Nuisance Animal Hunting in Cities and Suburbs

By    |   Saturday, 30 May 2015 05:14 PM

Michigan residents often find nuisance animals in their yards, sheds and garages. Each city or township regulates the control of nuisance animals through hunting or other means. Trapping is the most common method of dealing with these critters. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources also allows for residents to apply for nuisance animal control permits.

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Here are four things you should know about taking care of nuisance animals in Michigan's cities and suburbs.

1. Private property must experience damage to qualify for a permit. In other words, if the animal is simply annoying, it does not qualify for removal. The nuisance animal may be trapped in accordance with state law. If actions are taken upon any animal that is not causing damage, the individual is subject to prosecution under wildlife laws.

2. No training is required to obtain a permit. Permits are issued free of charge.

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3. Four types of nuisance permits are available.
  • Restricted Wildlife Damage and Nuisance Control Permit: This permit is provided to nuisance animal control businesses and organizations and enables them to apply pesticides in accordance with Michigan Department of Agriculture regulations.
  • General Wildlife Damage and Nuisance Control Permit: This permit is similar to the restricted permit, but less specific in nature.
  • Project Control Permit: This specialized permit is only available to licensed pesticide applicators when pesticides are being proposed that will be used outside of buildings that are not located in industrial areas.
  • Damage and Nuisance Animal Control Permit: This permit is issued by a conservation officer or wildlife biologist and is provided to landowners and lessees on a case-by-case basis. An inspection must be completed prior to a permit being issued.

4. Proper measures must be followed for removing animals. If an animal dies or is killed, the carcass must be disposed of within 24 hours of discovery. If the animal is trapped, it must be released within the same county where it was caught. Individuals cannot pass their problem off on to another neighborhood, and must release the animal in a rural environment.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Michigan residents often find nuisance animals in their yards, sheds and garages. Each city or township regulates the control of nuisance animals through hunting or other means.
Michigan, hunting, urban
385
2015-14-30
Saturday, 30 May 2015 05:14 PM
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