Tags: Prostate Health | malignant neoplasm | prostate | cancer | diagnosis

Malignant Neoplasm of Prostate: What a Cancer Diagnosis Means for You

By    |   Monday, 20 Jun 2016 02:59 PM

A malignant neoplasm of the prostate means a new growth of cancerous tissue. Prostate cancer is a risk for men as they age, increasing as they reach the elderly category. This cancer rarely happens to men under age 40.

Prostate cancer is often slow-growing, and when detected early, it can be treated successfully, says Healthguideinfo.com. Men with a higher risk of prostate cancer include African-Americans and those with a family history of the disease.

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Screening starting about age 50, or earlier for high-risk men, helps with an early diagnosis because prostate cancer often does not cause symptoms for years. The prostate gland, necessary for the male reproductive process, is near the urethra, so urinary difficulties are often the first signs.

Prostate screening tests may include a digital rectal exam to look for abnormalities in the prostate gland and taking blood samples through a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Doctors also might use ultrasound or take prostate tissue samples to determine if a patient has prostate cancer.

A diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the prostate, or prostate cancer, means you can still have a full, healthy life ahead because of the advanced therapies now available. Treatments depend on age, the stage of cancer, and how far the malignant neoplasm of the prostate has spread.

Radical prostatectomy is the most frequently used surgical technique, according to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. This includes removal of the entire prostate gland and areas surrounding it.

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Although urinary difficulties continue after surgery, most men regain their urinary control after a year. Sexual function may continue, but it depends on age and the nerves that have been spared in the operation.

Radiation therapy treats cancer that has been contained in the prostate or areas near it. Hormone therapy to reduce the size of the malignant neoplasm is often used for late stages of cancer or if surgery and radiation are not possible.

Other therapies might work to freeze the tumor or target the cancer cells. Chemotherapy is used when the prostate cancer has spread to other organs.

Urinary problems, bowel difficulties, and sexual dysfunction are among the side effects of treatment for a malignant neoplasm of the prostate. However, treatments are available to relieve or eliminate these effects.

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A malignant neoplasm of the prostate means a new growth of cancerous tissue. Prostate cancer is a risk for men as they age, increasing as they reach the elderly category. This cancer rarely happens to men under age 40.
malignant neoplasm, prostate, cancer, diagnosis
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2016-59-20
Monday, 20 Jun 2016 02:59 PM
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