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Secrets of Magnesium for Heart Health and Heart Attack Prevention

Image: Secrets of Magnesium for Heart Health and Heart Attack Prevention
Bottle of Magnesium vitamins with stethoscope. (Ilkajb/Dreamstime.com)

By    |   Thursday, 01 Jan 2015 02:39 PM

Low levels of magnesium have been linked to cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure, cholesterol, and hardening of the arteries. With a very high percentage of people not meeting the recommended daily intake of the mineral, many health professionals now suggest supplementing with magnesium for heart health and heart attack prevention.

According to the Weston A. Price Foundation
, "Strong bones and teeth, balanced hormones, a healthy nervous and cardiovascular system, well-functioning detoxification pathways and much more depend upon cellular magnesium sufficiency." Supplementing with the mineral is recommended because modern agriculture methods have depleted magnesium and other minerals in the soil, which has reduced the mineral content of foods.

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Integrative medicine cardiologist Dr. Stephen Sinatra says a shortage of magnesium "can cause or worsen congestive heart failure, atherosclerosis, chest pain (coronary vasospasm), high blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmias, heart muscle disease (cardiomyopathy), heart attack, and even sudden cardiac death." He further states that stress, prescription drugs, and a poor diet can serve to deplete magnesium levels. Dr. Sinatra recommends magnesium supplements for people who have had a heart attack, are prone to ventricular arrhythmia, are planning to have heart surgery, have congestive heart failure, high blood pressure or have been taking diuretics long-term.

Higher levels of magnesium may help prevent a heart attack by promoting heart health. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a 2010 study on the relationship between magnesium and sudden cardiac death. The researchers concluded, "higher plasma concentrations and dietary magnesium intakes were associated with lower risks of SCD."

Today's Geriatric Medicine reports
, "A decade-long study that reviewed cardiovascular disease research extending over more than 70 years found low magnesium levels contributed more to heart disease than did cholesterol or even saturated fat." Dr. Andrea Rosanoff, from the Center for Magnesium Education and Research LLC in Hawaii, says, "common risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure, and metabolic syndrome are all associated with low nutritional magnesium status or low magnesium dietary intakes.” Further, supplementing with magnesium to correct deficiencies "will correct or prevent cardiovascular disease events, including death."

Supplementing with magnesium has been shown to promote heart health and even prevent heart attacks. The supplements come in a variety of forms, from liquid, topical oil to oral tablets. Some have a strong laxative effect, such as magnesium oxide and magnesium citrate, which is considered the most absorbable oral form of supplementation. Chelated magnesium is magnesium bound to an amino acid and while it can be expensive, side effects are reduced and absorption is maximized.

This article is for information only and is not intended as medical advice. Talk with your doctor about your specific health and medical needs.

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Low levels of magnesium have been linked to cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure, cholesterol, and hardening of the arteries.
magnesium, heart, attack, prevention, secrets
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2015-39-01
Thursday, 01 Jan 2015 02:39 PM
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