Tags: Health Topics | Heart Disease | magnesium | afib | disruptive

Magnesium: AFIB Doesn't Have to Be Disruptive

By    |   Wednesday, 13 Jul 2016 01:47 AM

AFIB affects around 2.7 million Americans, reports the American Heart Association.

Magnesium may be a key component in decreasing AFIB or atrial fibrillation, a potentially serious problem with the heart’s rhythm.

AFIB, according to the AHA, occurs
when the upper chambers of the heart, the atria, quiver and beat irregularly impeding proper blood flow into the ventricles. The blood then slows down and pools, increasing the risk of blood clot formation and stroke.

Patients with AFIB often experience a fluttering sensation in the heart, nausea, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, fast or pounding heartbeat, and/or skipped beats. Often, symptoms are not felt at all.

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Magnesium may play a significant role in reducing or preventing episodes of AFIB.

Dr. Arthur Agatston
writes that magnesium
helps to regulate heart muscle activity and the nerves responsible for initiating each heart beat. When magnesium levels are low, the heart is more likely to produce an irregular heartbeat and palpitations.

When study participants were given intravenous magnesium for AFIB, reports Everyday Health, treatment was 60 percent more effective in reducing irregular heart rhythms associated with AFIB compared to those given the placebo.

Though there are many possible causes of AFIB, medical professionals also recommend being tested for mineral deficiencies such as magnesium or potassium, says Dr. Steve S. Ryan.

Reports have estimated that nearly 80 percent of Americans are deficient in magnesium and don’t get enough from the typical American diet.

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As magnesium is one of the main mechanisms required for proper heart cell functioning, some experts believe that people who suffer from AFIB are magnesium deficient.

As with any treatment, it is recommended that you speak with a medical professional before starting a magnesium protocol.

While it is often given in emergency situations, magnesium as a long-term treatment choice should be monitored by a doctor.

According to Kerri Knox at Easy Immune Health, due to magnesium’s ability to return an abnormal heart rhythm to normal, this “sudden conversion” to a normal rhythm can “cause dangerous blood clots to be released.”

Knox highly advises involving your cardiologist before starting magnesium if you have AFIB.

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AFIB affects around 2.7 million Americans, reports the American Heart Association. Magnesium may be a key component in decreasing AFIB or atrial fibrillation, a potentially serious problem with the heart’s rhythm.
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2016-47-13
Wednesday, 13 Jul 2016 01:47 AM
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