Tags: Thyroid Disorders | iodine | thyroid | health

Iodine and Your Thyroid Health: How It Helps

By    |   Wednesday, 09 Mar 2016 06:07 PM

The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system, and it uses iodine to produce thyroid hormones that regulate many of the body’s functions.

The American Thyroid Association explains that, without iodine, the thyroid gland cannot produce these important hormones. Iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism, a condition where the thyroid gland is underactive, resulting in a host of physical and mental symptoms.

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There is conflicting information in the medical community about the role of iodine in proper thyroid function and about increasing iodine in the diet as a means to treat hypothyroidism. According to Dr. David Brownstein in an article for Hypothyroid Mom, increasing iodine intake can have “miraculous” effects on overall health.

Brownstein goes on to explain that the belief many people, including healthcare practitioners, have that the body can get enough iodine from iodized salt is false. Iodized salt can supply only a small fraction of the U.S. recommended daily allowance (RDA) of iodine, and only about 10 percent of that iodine is easily absorbed by the body. He also asserts that the RDA of iodine, 150 micrograms (µg) is far too low to supply the thyroid with the levels it needs to function properly. “After 20 years of practicing medicine, I can state that it is impossible to treat thyroid illness if there is an inadequate level of iodine in the body and this includes autoimmune thyroid disorders,” he says.

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When choosing iodized salt, Brownstein recommends unrefined sea salt such as Celtic sea salt.

In addition to salt, there are are other iodine-rich foods. Other sources of dietary iodine are sea vegetables, saltwater fish and seafood, eggs, dairy products, radishes, onions, and watercress, according to an article on Women to Women.

Testing for proper iodine levels in the body is achieved most commonly through a urine test, says the American Thyroid Association. Women to Women also says you can do a simple self-test for iodine deficiency by using a cotton ball dipped in tincture of iodine, available at any pharmacy, to paint a small, red circle on the skin of the inner arm or thigh. If the stain disappears within 1-3 hours, you may need more iodine in your diet. It's important to talk to a doctor before making any drastic changes to your diet.

SPECIAL: The Real Truth About Iodized Salt the Food Industry Doesn't Want You to Know

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The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system, and it uses iodine to produce thyroid hormones that regulate many of the body's functions. The American Thyroid Association explains that, without iodine, the thyroid gland cannot produce these important hormones.
iodine, thyroid, health
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2016-07-09
Wednesday, 09 Mar 2016 06:07 PM
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