Tags: Gun Control | hunting | New Mexico | invasive species

Hunting in New Mexico: 4 Invasive Species to New Mexico and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Friday, 29 May 2015 04:40 PM

There are numerous invasive plant, insect, animal, and aquatic species that are invasive to New Mexico. Interestingly enough, several of the animal invasive species were first brought to New Mexico for the purpose of being hunted. The Wildlife News asserts that, "Unlike most states, New Mexico introduced a number of non-native exotic species from the Eastern Hemisphere." Here is a look at four invasive species in New Mexico and its rules for hunting them.

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  1. African Oryx
 - The African Oryx, also known as a gemsbok, was first introduced to New Mexico via the White Sands Missile Range. A species of antelope from the Kalahari region of Africa, the African Oryx's' large size makes them a highly desirable animal to hunt. With no natural predators to limit their growth, the exported African Oryx soon expanded from the Missile Range to the White Sands National Park. This invasion of the National Park resulted in a large off-putting fence being built. This fence scars an otherwise beautiful and untainted stretch of land. There are currently around 3,000 African Oryx in New Mexico. With a license, a hunter may harvest one African Oryx a season.


  2. Barbary Sheep
 - These sheep were exported to New Mexico from Africa's Barbary Coast. The National Park Service says that these sheep were introduced in 1950, to try to help build up the dwindling native Bighorn Sheep population. With a license, a certified hunter may harvest one Barbary sheep a season.
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  4. Persian Ibex
 - These recently introduced species of Ibex have just been introduced in New Mexico's Florida Mountains. Originally only 12 ibex were imported. Now, the New Mexican Bureau of Land Management estimates the Persian Ibex population at around 400 animals. Ever since 1972, the ibex has been available for hunting. With a license, a certified hunter may bag one Persian Ibex per season.

  5. Feral Hogs
 - The New Mexico Department of Hunting & Fish invites hunters to kill all of the feral hogs that they can find. The department bemoans that feral hogs, "damage habitat, contaminate water, and compete with native wildlife." They are an unprotected alien species. This means that hunters do not need to be residents of New Mexico or need a special hunting license to hunt feral hogs. Feral hogs can be hunted year round. Hunters should pay caution that they do not accidentally shoot a javelina instead of a feral hog. Javelinas are a protected species in New Mexico that resemble the feral hog. However Javelinas are much smaller and lack tails.
This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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There are numerous invasive plant, insect, animal, and aquatic species that are invasive to New Mexico. Interestingly enough, several of the animal invasive species were first brought to New Mexico for the purpose of being hunted.
hunting, New Mexico, invasive species
466
2015-40-29
Friday, 29 May 2015 04:40 PM
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