Tags: Gun Control | hunting | New Jersey | private lands

Hunting in New Jersey: 8 Things to Know About Hunting on Private Lands

By    |   Friday, 29 May 2015 11:52 AM

Hunting in New Jersey is an amazing experience because of the state's natural resources. New Jersey's verdant Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) ensure that there are ample numbers of species to support the local ecosystems during hunting seasons. New Jersey hunters have access to 500,000 acres of public land. New Jersey's Division of Fish and Wildlife estimates that more than 348,000 acres of land compose the state's 121 WMAs. Despite the ample hunting land on public property, there are often amazing hot spots on private land not available anywhere else. Thus, it is important that hunters understand the correct way to legally hunt on private land. Here are eight things to know about hunting on private land in New Jersey.
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  1. You must have a hunting license in order to hunt on private land.

  2. The same hunting seasons apply to hunters hunting on private land and public land.
  3. You must get permission from a landowner before you may hunt on their land. Some will let you hunt for free, but most will request a fee. So, if you intend to hunt on another person's property, be prepared to pay the landowner for access to their land.
  4. Unlike public land, on private land you may hunt deer on Sundays.
  5. The New Jersey law N.J.S.A. 2A: 42A-2 et sec, more commonly known as the Hunter Liability Act, states that the landowner does not legally have to warn hunters of any dangerous structures or areas on their land. Hunters should be wary for dangerous areas when they hunt in case the landowner omitted any important details.
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  7. In order to hunt in growing cropland, hunters must receive specific approval from the landowner.
  8. Hunters may be arrested if they damage any of the landowner's property, whether or not they did so on purpose. Examples of property include cultivated crops, buildings, livestock, or fences. Anyone who damages private property while hunting may receive up to a $2,000 fine as well as forced compensation to the landowner for all property damaged. Additionally, the hunter responsible for the damage may be banned from hunting in New Jersey for a maximum of five years.
  9. If a farmer has a deer problem, they are often willing to allow hunters to hunt deer on their land free of charge.
This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Hunting in New Jersey is an amazing experience because of the state's natural resources. New Jersey's verdant Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) ensure that there are ample numbers of species to support the local ecosystems during hunting seasons.
hunting, New Jersey, private lands
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2015-52-29
Friday, 29 May 2015 11:52 AM
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