Tags: Gun Control | hunting | minnesota | landowners | private

Hunting in Minnesota: Five Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Wednesday, 27 May 2015 09:15 PM

Many hunters are eager to hunt on private property to gain better access to game without competition from other hunters. If you're a Minnesota landowner, it can mean being inundated with multiple requests to use your property during hunting season.

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Some landowners are cautious about allowing access to their private lands for hunting. They worry about careless hunters damaging property, scaring livestock or pets, and endangering their family if shots are fired near buildings. The good news is Minnesota law favors landowners when it comes hunting on private property.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources shares several important guidelines for landowners on its website to give them a better understanding their rights during hunting season:

1. Hunters must obtain permission before hunting.

Minnesota law requires all hunters to obtain permission from a landowner before hunting on their property. Even if the land is not posted, it is still required. Failure to obtain permission constitutes trespassing and can result in a hunter losing their license and paying a fine.

2. Landowners are not liable for injuries or damages.

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If a landowner allows a hunter to use their land for hunting or other recreational purposes without charge, under Minnesota law, they are not held liable for injuries suffered to the hunter or damages to the hunter's property incurred on their land. 

3. Hunters use land at their own risk.

Landowners do not have to offer assurances that their land is safe for hunting or any other recreational activity done without charge. Minnesota law places liability for injuries or damages on the hunter who uses the land under oral or written permission. 

4. Landowners should obtain contact and vehicle information.

When giving permission to use their property for hunting, landowners should take down contact information and vehicle information for each member of the hunting party. This can be turned over to the proper authorities should a hunter go missing, suffer an accident, or break the law.

5. Landowners need to report violations of the law.

If landowners find evidence of poaching committed by a hunter on their property, they should report it to a local DNR officer. Hunting animals out of season is a criminal offense and is punishable by a fine or jail time.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Many hunters are eager to hunt on private property to gain better access to game without competition from other hunters. If you're a Minnesota landowner, it can mean being inundated with multiple requests to use your property during hunting season.
hunting, minnesota, landowners, private
417
2015-15-27
Wednesday, 27 May 2015 09:15 PM
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