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Hunting in Michigan: 2 Invasive Species to Michigan and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Friday, 29 May 2015 11:47 AM

Michigan’s landscape of abundant forests is a paradise to many hunters, but not all species of animals are welcome in the habitat. Invasive species pose a threat to humans and other animals by destroying habitat and spreading disease. Michigan hunters, under the direction of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, can hunt invasive species in Michigan.

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The two predominant non-aquatic invasive species in Michigan are:

1. Mute Swans

Mute swans pose a threat to the native species of Michigan and not native to the state or even North America. The bird was introduced to the area in the 1800s in an effort to decorate the landscapes of the state’s parks and estates. With the release of the first captive pair in 1919 the population began to boom. Today mute swans pose a danger to humans, wildlife, and wetland habitats.

Mute swans are not outright hunted in Michigan, but can be removed under certain circumstances.

The DNR allows the removal of mute swans, nests, and eggs under permit for any of the following situations:
  • To stabilize or reduce the population levels or to prevent new populations of mute swans from establishing.
  • To prevent the bird from interference with the establishment, re-establishment or reproductive success of endangered, threatened or native wildlife species.
  • To protect public health, safety, or welfare, as these birds are aggressive in nature.
DNR permits are required to take any of the above actions.

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2. Feral Swine

Feral swine were never present on Michigan’s landscape until the last 30 years. This invasive has been a growing problem for the state as the animal can be a parasite host and carry diseases that threaten humans. According to the DNR, feral swine can carry a number of diseases, including, salmonellosis, toxoplasmosis, sarcoptic mange, tuberculosis, anthrax, rabies, and plague.

Not only are feral swine dangerous carriers, the animals are aggressive and violent when cornered. Their massive tusks can easily cause bodily injury. In an effort to control the population any hunter with any valid Michigan hunting license can shoot feral swine on sight while hunting. Private property owners can shoot feral swine on their property and do not need to be in possession of a hunting license. Those who hunt feral swine are encouraged to provide samples for disease testing.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Michigan's landscape of abundant forests is a paradise to many hunters, but not all species of animals are welcome in the habitat. Invasive species pose a threat to humans and other animals by destroying habitat and spreading disease.
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2015-47-29
Friday, 29 May 2015 11:47 AM
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