Tags: Gun Control | hunting in south dakota | landowners | private property

Hunting in South Dakota: 5 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 11:01 AM

Hunting is extremely popular in South Dakota. The main hunting season for most big game begins in the fall and changes the face and atmosphere of the state. Non-residents flock to South Dakota looking to take down a prized animal such as an antelope or elk.

This influx brings a significant amount of tourism revenue into the state, having a positive economic effect on many industries such as hospitality. Although there are many benefits to the increased number of hunters in South Dakota, there can be a negative impact on the state’s residents, especially landowners.

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Hunters unfamiliar with the state’s hunting rules and regulations may end up breaking laws concerning trespassing and hunting on private land.

Landowners should understand what is permissible on their property. These five items will help them understand the laws related to hunting on private property in South Dakota:

1. Hunting by the Land Owner
According to the South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks website
, “Resident landowners and their immediate family (husband, wife, and children residing at home or on land owned or leased by the landowner) may trap furbearers and hunt their property for small game without obtaining a hunting or trapping license.”

2. Landowner Waterfowl Hunting
Those who wish to hunt on their own land for waterfowl do not need a license similar to the laws on hunting small game and furbearers. However, if the landowner wants to hunt ducks, geese, swans, or mergansers, they must purchase a Federal Waterfowl Stamp.

3. Unarmed Retrieval on Private Land

If a hunter legally kills small game and it ends up on private property that is not leased for public hunting, that hunter is allowed to retrieve the small game on the private property without permission of the landowner if they are unarmed and on foot.

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This rule does not apply to turkey and big game, for which the hunter needs to receive permission from the landowner.

4. Trespassing

The state department of Game, Fish, and Parks is clear about hunting while trespassing. It notes that “No person may hunt or trap any species of game, including unprotected species, on private land without permission from the owner or lessee except in that part of the Black Hills Fire Protection District south of Interstate 90. In that area, no person may enter private land to hunt if the land is posted or if told by the owner or lessee not to do so.”

5. Volunteer Hunter Program

If landowners would like to have antelope, deer, turkey, or Canada Geese harvested from their land, they can use the state’s Volunteer Hunter Program, which pairs hunters with private landowners.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Hunting is extremely popular in South Dakota. The main hunting season for most big game begins in the fall and changes the face and atmosphere of the state. Non-residents flock to South Dakota looking to take down a prized animal such as an antelope or elk.
hunting in south dakota, landowners, private property
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2015-01-04
Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 11:01 AM
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