Tags: Gun Control | hunting in kansas | invasive species | rules

Hunting in Kansas: 5 Invasive Species to Kansas and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Thursday, 21 May 2015 01:58 PM

Species that come from another location are often described as invasive but need not refer to exotic species but instead be domestic animals that have gone feral and migrated or spread from neighboring areas, overcoming native species in the process.

Here are four examples of invasive species or pests as indicated by the year-round no-limit hunting season applicable to each in Kansas:

ALERT: Should Obama Have More Control Over Guns? Vote Now

1. Feral Hogs
Perhaps one of the more destructive species, with $500 million worth of damage in Texas alone each year. Kansas has reacted well to the threat and has all but eliminated feral hogs, but still has to remain diligent on state borders, where specially trained helicopter crews and locals prevent further incursion. Under state law, residents do not need a hunting license to hunt feral hogs.

2. Feral Pigeons, Rats, and More
Unless exempt, a hunting license is required to hunt ground squirrels, woodchucks, kangaroo rats, wood rats, armadillos, porcupines, feral pigeons, starlings, house sparrows, rodents, and certain amphibians and reptiles. Hunting season is year around and apart from the use of automatic weapons and a limit of five per day per species, pretty much anything goes. However, don't shine bright lights in their eyes. All of these species are considered pests as they carry disease or cause damage to crops.

VOTE NOW: Is Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback Doing a Good Job?

3.Asian Carp
Originally farmed, these voracious carp are now common in Midwestern environments and grow up to 4 feet in length. There are four distinct types, all of which grow quickly and consume almost half their body weight each day. Already present in the Kansas, Missouri, Big Blue and Wakarusa rivers. If caught elsewhere, note the time and location, freeze it, and inform the Emporia Research Office.

4. White Perch
Originally native to the Atlantic coast and no more than 10 inches in length, these fish compete with native bass for food and also interbreed with white bass. Spread by the general public, who transferred them to new environments, these perch feed on bait relied on by other species. Anglers are recommended to dispose of them or eat them but never release back in the water. If caught in a new location , please inform the Emporia Research Office and freeze in a sealed plastic bag.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

URGENT: Do You Support Obama's Plans for Stricter Gun Control? Vote Now

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Species that come from another location are often described as invasive but need not refer to exotic species but instead be domestic animals that have gone feral and migrated or spread from neighboring areas, overcoming native species in the process.
hunting in kansas, invasive species, rules
416
2015-58-21
Thursday, 21 May 2015 01:58 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved