Tags: Gun Control | hunting in Iowa | invasive species

Hunting in Iowa: 3 Invasive Species to Iowa and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Monday, 26 Oct 2015 09:58 PM

June 1 marks the beginning of Invasive Species Month in Iowa as a way to heighten the attention of problematic species that are threatening the land, waterways, and species of Iowa. Those who enjoy hunting in Iowa should be aware of threats and know how to handle them when contact is made.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines invasive animals as being “introduced multicellular organisms of the kingdom Animalia.” These animals, which include mammals, birds, reptiles and insects, thrive outside of their native homes.

A complete list of invasive species can be found on the Invasive.org website and through the Department of Natural Resources. Here are three examples listed below:

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1. Wild Boar
The wild boar has many common names that include wild hog, feral hog, feral pig, Old World swine, razorback, Russian wild boar, and Eurasian wild boar. It was introduced as a source of food and may have escaped domestication or released intentionally. No permit is required to hunt a wild boar in Iowa. People who come across a wild boar, either alive or dead, should contact a local wildlife biologist or the USDA so that a blood sample of the hog may be taken.

2. Brown Tree Snake
This species is thought to have arrived from imported cargo as it is a native of Indonesia, Australia, and Papua New Guinea. It preys on native birds and lizards, and because the snake is such a good climber, it often is responsible for power outages due to crawling along power lines. A permit is not needed to take a brown tree snake.

3. European Starling
Native to Eurasia, the European starling competes with other native species for territory and food while it also has a hand in destroying crops. According to the USDA National Agricultural Library, it was introduced in 1890 as a part of a plan to increase bird species varieties in the U.S. It is not necessary to have a permit in Iowa to take a European starling

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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June 1 marks the beginning of Invasive Species Month in Iowa as a way to heighten the attention of problematic species that are threatening the land, waterways, and species of Iowa. Those who enjoy hunting in Iowa should be aware of threats and know how to handle them.
hunting in Iowa, invasive species
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2015-58-26
Monday, 26 Oct 2015 09:58 PM
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