Tags: Gun Control | hunting in Indiana | dogs

Hunting in Indiana: Regulations for Hunting With Dogs

By    |   Thursday, 22 Oct 2015 02:20 AM

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) was established in 1919 with the explicit goal of expanding hunting in the region by purchasing land for public use. This includes opportunities for hunting with dogs.

Today, there are 380 public access sites available to hunters and fishermen covering 670,000 acres along with over 100 fish and wildlife areas and various satellite properties. Outdoor Life said, “With just more than 2 percent of the state publicly owned, Indiana isn't known for its access. But the state does offer some solid public hunting opportunities.”

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When hunting with dogs, there are some notable rules and regulations hunters must take note of before embarking on their journey. When using dogs to hunt in Indiana, it’s important to know when the appropriate seasons begin. According to IDNR each season varies, when using dogs, depending upon which animal is being hunted. For example, dogs can be used in a hunt for raccoon and opossums from early February through late October. Meanwhile, dogs can be used to hunt foxes from mid-October to mid-February, while coyote hunting lasts from mid-October to mid-March.

Also, valid licenses are required for dog hunting. These are different from regular hunting licenses. However, youths under age 13 are exempt from needing either type. Though, they cannot posses a bow, crossbow, or firearm and must be in the presence of an adult who has a valid hunting license.

In Indiana, it’s illegal to chase foxes and coyotes with dogs all year, and must be done during the specified seasons. Furthermore, hunting any protected species with dogs is not allowed, including badgers, bobcats, and river otters. However, since controlling dogs can sometimes be difficult, there is some leeway allowed for accidents. The IDNR wrote, “There is no penalty for reporting accidental captures. If the animal is dead, the carcass must be surrendered to an Indiana Conservation Officer.”

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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The Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) was established in 1919 with the explicit goal of expanding hunting in the region by purchasing land for public use. This includes opportunities for hunting with dogs.
hunting in Indiana, dogs
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2015-20-22
Thursday, 22 Oct 2015 02:20 AM
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