Tags: Gun Control | hunting in illinois | landowners | private property

Hunting in Illinois: 6 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Wednesday, 20 May 2015 01:30 PM

In a survey from 2009 done by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife Resources and Illinois Natural History, 58 percent of hunters hunted on private property that they didn't own as opposed to public lands.

Most hunters prefer it, but landowners are not always at ease. Hence the Recreational Use of Land and Water Areas Act, part of the Civil Immunities chapter of the Illinois Compiled Statutes.

The Act has made it easier for private landowners to allow hunting
on their land by providing limited liability and peace of mind. It states, "The purpose of the Act is to encourage owners of land to make land and water areas available to any individual or members of the public for recreational or conservation purposes by limiting their liability toward persons entering thereon for such purposes."

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When dealing with hunting in Illinois, there are six things for landowners to know about allowing hunting on private property:

1. Hunters must ask permission to hunt on private property. There's even a land access permission form from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources that landowners and hunters may keep on hand as a safeguard. The user promises to abide by landowner rules, conduct himself or herself in an ethical manner, and not hold the landowner liable for any personal injury that may take place on the property.

2. Landowners cannot charge a fee for use of their land or their rights and protection under the act is invalid. Public access must be free.

3. Landowners don't have to perform any extensive upkeep of their property.
Hunters must assume responsibility for any possible unsafe areas or conditions that exist on the property. However, hunters should be warned about dangerous structures or conditions.

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4. Landowners are not liable for accidents or conditions that occur while hunters are on their property. Hunters are responsible for their own safety.

5. It is unlawful for hunters to damage property while on private property, and most are considerate and appreciative and respectful of landowners' property and wishes.

6. Liability covers both individuals the landowner invited onto the property and the general public, so friends and strangers are all covered.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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In a survey from 2009 done by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife Resources and Illinois Natural History, 58 percent of hunters hunted on private property that they didn't own as opposed to public lands.
hunting in illinois, landowners, private property
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2015-30-20
Wednesday, 20 May 2015 01:30 PM
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