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High Blood Pressure: How to Stop Stress That Can Make Your Blood Boil

By    |   Monday, 25 Jul 2016 08:05 PM

Stressful situations may result in high blood pressure and related health conditions. Even people with normal blood pressure rates have increased blood pressure temporarily during stressful events.

Although research remains mixed on the link between stress and high blood pressure, avoiding unnecessary stress is a way to maintain heart health, the Mayo Clinic explains.

Temporary spikes in blood pressure could lead to high blood pressure over time. During stressful situations, the body produces more hormones that increase the heart rate, narrow blood vessels and increase blood pressure. Anxiety and depression may contribute to heart disease if the arteries are damaged because of frequent or chronic stress.

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A healthy lifestyle may help prevent or reduce high blood pressure as well as protect people from heart disease.

Along with reducing stress, lifestyle approaches include regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, not smoking, and eating healthy foods, according to Harvard Medical School.

Avoiding stress isn’t always easy, but simple strategies help to reduce and relieve stress and tension in daily life:
  • Relaxation techniques include meditation, yoga, deep breathing exercises, and progressive muscle relaxation, a practice that tenses up then relaxes muscle groups throughout the body. A massage, taking a nap and walking are also relaxation techniques.
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  • Getting enough sleep improves mood and alertness so people can deal better with stress.
  • Scheduling time more efficiently for work and personal matters reduces stress levels.
  • Including more people in your social network by joining organizations or taking classes avoids stress. It also helps to talk to friends or family members about stressful conditions affecting you.
  • Resolving stressful situations at work or home involves problem solving and negotiation abilities.
  • Don’t overextend yourself by promising too much. It’s OK not to commit yourself to doing too many things, the American Heart Association advises. Be realistic about priorities and how much can be done in a day or over a certain period of time.
  • Spending less time in situations or with people that are bothersome helps to reduce stress that can lead to high blood pressure.

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Stressful situations may result in high blood pressure and related health conditions. Even people with normal blood pressure rates have increased blood pressure temporarily during stressful events. Avoiding stress isn’t always easy, but simple strategies help reduce and relieve stress.
high blood pressure, stop, stress
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2016-05-25
Monday, 25 Jul 2016 08:05 PM
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