Tags: Gun Control | fishing | mississippi | invasive species | aquatic

Fishing in Mississippi: 5 Invasive Aquatic Species and State's Rules for Catching Them

By    |   Tuesday, 26 Jan 2016 06:03 PM

Anglers going fishing in Mississippi should be aware of invasive aquatic species that aren't native to the area. Certain fish must be treated differently than other types of species because they can cause damage to the ecosystem.

Here are five invasive species and the rules for catching them in Mississippi.

ALERT: Should Obama Have More Control Over Guns? Vote Now

1. Lionfish

This species, which is native to southern Japan, Micronesia, Australia, and the Philippines, first arrived in the U.S. when introduced as aquarium fish. They are now common throughout the Atlantic Ocean as well as in Mississippi in the Gulf of Mexico. There no rules prohibiting the capture of these fish. The Gulf Coast Research Laboratory at the University of Southern Mississippi was offering a $5 reward for each lionfish submitted for research, but the program has been suspended.

2. Giant River Prawn

Native to southern Asia and Australia, this crustacean can now be found in freshwater lakes and on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. There are not currently any laws in Mississippi specifically prohibiting the capture of giant river prawns; however, they are not classified as game fish.

3. Rock Bass

While this species was specifically introduced in many areas of the U.S. for sport fishing, it has since cause damaged to native fish and species. It is legal to catch them in Mississippi, with the per-day number varying between areas. Visit the U.S. Geological Survey for local rock bass information.

4. Smallmouth Bass

While native to some areas of the U.S., including the Great Lakes region, this type of bass is considered an invasive species in Mississippi and thereabouts. According to the state’s Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks, when fishing in Mississippi it is legal to catch up to 10 smallmouth bass per day.

URGENT: Do You Support Obama's Plans for Stricter Gun Control? Vote Now

5. Vermiculated Sailfin Catfish

Native to South America, this invasive species is now found throughout the American South, including in the Pearl River in Mississippi. There are only creel limits on catfish in certain places in Mississippi, including Lake Okhissa in Franklin County (limit 5), ReCon Lake in Bolivar County (limit 10), and all Department of Wildlife lakes (limit 10). When fishing in Mississippi in waters reciprocated with Alabama and Tennessee, you may catch no more than one catfish that is greater than 34 inches in length.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before fishing.

Related Stories:

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Anglers going fishing in Mississippi should be aware of invasive aquatic species that aren't native to the area. Certain fish must be treated differently than other types of species because they can cause damage to the ecosystem.
fishing, mississippi, invasive species, aquatic
435
2016-03-26
Tuesday, 26 Jan 2016 06:03 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved