Tags: Digestive Problems | dandruff | probiotics

Dandruff and Probiotics: What You Need to Know

By    |   Tuesday, 29 Dec 2015 04:58 PM

For people who struggle with dandruff, probiotics may help with the problem.

Dandruff — also known as seborrheic dermatitis — results from the overgrowth of fungus, particularly the Malassezia furfur yeast, causing flakiness, itchiness, and redness in the greasiest parts of the head, according to Body Ecology. Probiotics are the good bacteria found in the intestines, and research shows they are instrumental in boosting immunity, mental health, and digestion.

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Dermatology News reports in addition to those benefits, probiotics may also reduce dandruff. In one study, 57 men took probiotics or a placebo. Of those who took the probiotics, 72 percent experienced less dandruff.

Consumption of the healthy bacteria also showed to reduce scalp erythema, itching, gresiness, and scalp Malassezia yeast counts, according to Dermatology News.

Due to probiotics' interaction with the immune system, they can keep yeast overgrowth in check, according to The Guardian. By adding the healthy bacteria to the gut, the probiotics crowds out yeast overgrowth.

Specifically, the bacillus laterosporus strain has been shown to be effective in reducing the presence of dandruff, according to Natural Society. Another study showed the effectiveness of Lactobacillus paracasei.

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Prebiotics may be helpful for people with dandruff, as well, according to The Alternative Daily. Fibrous and starchy foods foment an environment in which probiotics can colonize and grow. Plantains and potatoes are some sources of prebiotics.

Body Ecology recommends having a daily intake of fermented foods, probiotics-filled beverages, or supplements.

If a patient chooses to use supplements, avoid those with processed milk and sugar because they promote the growth of yeast fungi.

It is best to speak with a doctor before starting to take probiotics. Dietary supplements do not need approval from the Food and Drug Administration and should, therefore, be used with caution.

Some data supports the idea that probiotics may also be effective in combating atopic dermatitis. More research, however, is needed on probiotics’ effect on dandruff.

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For people who struggle with dandruff, probiotics may help with the problem. Dandruff - also known as seborrheic dermatitis - results from the overgrowth of fungus, particularly the Malassezia furfur yeast, causing flakiness, itchiness, and redness.
dandruff, probiotics
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2015-58-29
Tuesday, 29 Dec 2015 04:58 PM
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